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Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Seizing opportunities for intervention: Changing HIV-related knowledge among men who have sex with men and transgender women attending trusted community centers in Nigeria
Background Knowledge of HIV risk factors and reduction strategies is essential for prevention in key populations such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW). We evaluated factors associated with HIV-related knowledge among MSM and TGW and the impact of engagement in care at trusted community health centers in Nigeria. Methods The TRUST/RV368 cohort recruited MSM and TGW in Lagos and Abuja, Nigeria via respondent driven sampling. During study visits every three months, participants underwent structured interviews to collect behavioral data, received HIV education, and were provided free condoms and condom compatible lubricants. Five HIV-related knowledge questions were asked at enrollment and repeated after 9 and 15 months. The mean number of correct responses was calculated for each visit with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multivariable Poisson regression was used to calculate adjusted risk ratios and CIs for factors associated with answering more knowledge questions correctly. Results From March 2013 to April 2018, 2122 persons assigned male sex at birth were enrolled, including 234 TGW (11.2%). The mean number of correct responses at enrollment was 2.36 (95% CI: 2.31–2.41) and increased to 2.95 (95% CI: 2.86–3.04) and 3.06 (95% CI: 2.97–3.16) after 9 and 15 months in the study, respectively. Among 534 participants who completed all three HIV-related knowledge assessments, mean number of correct responses rose from 2.70 (95% CI: 2.60–2.80) to 3.02 (95% CI: 2.93–3.13) and then 3.06 (95% CI: 2.96–3.16). Factors associated with increased overall HIV-related knowledge included longer duration of study participation, HIV seropositivity, higher education level, and more frequent internet use. Conclusions There was suboptimal HIV-related knowledge among Nigerian MSM and TGW at that improved modestly with engagement in care. These data demonstrate unmet HIV education needs among Nigerian MSM and TGW and provide insights into modalities that could be used to address these needs.
Located in MPRC People / Hongjie Liu, Ph.D. / Hongjie Liu Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Life and Death in the American City: Men’s Life Expectancy in 25 Major American Cities From 1990 to 2015
The past several decades have witnessed growing geographic disparities in life expectancy within the United States, yet the mortality experience of U.S. cities has received little attention. We examine changes in men’s life expectancy at birth for the 25 largest U.S. cities from 1990 to 2015, using mortality data with city of residence identifiers. We reveal remarkable increases in life expectancy for several U.S. cities. Men’s life expectancy increased by 13.7 years in San Francisco and Washington, DC, and by 11.8 years in New York between 1990 and 2015, during which overall U.S. life expectancy increased by just 4.8 years. A significant fraction of gains in the top-performing cities relative to the U.S. average is explained by reductions in HIV/AIDS and homicide during the 1990s and 2000s. Although black men tended to see larger life expectancy gains than white men in most cities, changes in socioeconomic and racial population composition also contributed to these trends.
Located in MPRC People / Michel Boudreaux, Ph.D. / Michel Boudreaux Publications
Change in Elderly Living Arrangements in Rural South Africa, 2000-2010
Sangeetha Madhavan project, an R03 funded by NICHD, examines the impact of HIV on the probability that an elderly person will face a transition in living arrangements
Located in Research / Selected Research
Analyzing the effects of food supplementation and adherence support on food insecurity, time allocation, and quality of life indices of patients on antiretroviral treatment in the Free State Province, South Africa
Alok Bhargava investigates food insecurity, quality of life, and productivity among HIV patients receiving antiretroviral treatment in South Africa
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Creative and Novel Ideas in HIV Research (CNIHR) Research Grant Initiative
Awards will be funded up to $150,000
Located in Resources / / Announcements / Archive
Dreams Innovation Challenge on HIV/AIDS
U.S. Department of State
Located in Resources / / Announcements / Archive
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Measuring and Mitigating HIV Stigma: A Framed Field Experiment
Vivian Hoffman, University of Maryland; Kent D. Messer and Jacob Fooks, University of Delaware // Keywords: HIV/AIDS, field experiment, stigma; 2012-003
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Journal Club Meeting with Typhanye Dyer
Examining Psychosocial and Behavioral Correlates of STI and HIV Risk among Men who have Sex with Men (MSM) and Men who have Sex with Men and Women (MSMW)
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Treating Culture: The Making of HIV / AIDS Experts and Communities
Thurka Sangaramoorthy, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Maryland
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Testing a Syndemic Index of Psychosocial and Structural Factors associated with HIV Testing among Black Men
Black populations in the United States are disproportionately affected by HIV. This disparity may be affected by social and structural barriers to HIV testing, leading to undiagnosed infection and prolonged HIV transmissibility. Using data from a nationally representative sample of 1,727 Black men in the 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System we tested for differences in poverty, depression, and health care barriers between Black men who had been HIV tested in the past year and those who had not. We also tested a syndemic index of these factors. Number of syndemic factors was linearly associated with less HIV testing (aPR=0.79, 95% CI 0.66-0.95). Assumptions of unidimensionality were met. The use of a syndemic index was a superior approach to analyzing these factors individually, both in terms of model fit and associations detected. The accumulation of poverty, depression, and health care barriers has an adverse impact on HIV testing among Black men.
Located in MPRC People / Natalie Slopen, Sc.D. / Natalie Slopen Publications