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Taylor Hargrove, University of North Carolina
Health Contextualized: Inequalities in Physiological Function at the Intersection of Race, Skin Color, and Place
Located in Coming Up
Article ReferenceInternational organizations and the political economy of reforms
We develop a simple dynamic model of policy reform that captures some of the determinants that underlie the differences between the reform paths taken by a number of countries since the early 1990s. The model focuses on the interaction between domestic institutions and international organizations that promote reform, on the one hand, and the political incentives for reversing reforms, on the other. At equilibrium, there are three types of reform paths. A country can undergo a full-scale, lasting reform, can carry out a partial but lasting reform, or can go through cycles of reforms and costly counter-reforms. Domestic institutions, along with the incentives provided by international organizations, determine the equilibrium path. A politically myopic international organization may induce cycles of reforms and costly counter-reforms, thereby reducing the country's well-being. An international organization that only provides funds to promote reforms may have a less beneficial effect than one that assists the country with fresh funds to defend reforms when there is a risk of reversal. International funds that promote reforms can also influence domestic institutions. For example, due to the intervention of an international organization, countries could have incentives to dismantle institutions that build up reversal cost and/or do not fully build their fiscal capacity.
Located in MPRC People / Sebastian Galiani, Ph.D. / Sebastian Galiani Publications
Michael White, Brown University
Migration, Urbanization, and Health: Insights from South Africa
Located in Coming Up
Corinne Reczek, Ohio State University
Who are LGBTQ People?: A Demographic Profile of a Growing Population
Located in Coming Up
Nolan Pope, Economics UMD
Timing is Everything: Evidence from College Major Decisions
Located in Coming Up
Article ReferenceA snapshot of discrimination experiences among sexual minorities in the United States.
Located in MPRC People / Jessica N Fish, Ph.D. / Jessica N Fish Publications
Abraham on gig-economy
Ridesharing services impacting economic growth
Located in News
Lauren Porter, Criminology and Criminal Justice
Challenges in the Continuity of Care among Formerly Incarcerated Persons with HIV or HCV
Located in Coming Up
Anne Pebley, UCLA
Is occupational stratification responsible for social inequality in old age disability in Mexico?
Located in Coming Up
Article ReferenceA Conversation with Robert Groves
Professor Robert M. Groves is among the world leaders in survey methodology and survey statistics over the last four decades. Groves’ research—particularly on survey nonresponse, survey errors and costs, and responsive design—helped to provide intellectual footing for a new academic discipline. In addition, Groves has had remarkable success building academic programs that integrate the social sciences with statistics and computer science. He was instrumental in the development of degree programs in survey methodology at the University of Michigan and the University of Maryland. Recently, as Provost of Georgetown University, he has championed the use of big data sets to increase understanding of society and human behavior. Between his academic tenures, Groves served as Director of the US Census Bureau. Professor Groves is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association, elected member of the International Statistical Institute, elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, elected member of the US National Academy of Sciences, elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the US National Academies and presidential appointed member of the National Science Board. The interview was conducted in early 2016 at Georgetown University.
Located in MPRC People / Partha Lahiri, Ph.D. / Partha Lahiri Publications