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Kirsten Stoebenau, Behavioral & Community Health
"Come, we try" - A qualitative study of changing marital practices in low-income settings in Eastern Africa and the implications for maternal and child health
Located in Coming Up
Laura Lindberg, Guttmacher Institute
Completeness of Abortion Reporting in Three National Surveys in the United States
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Punishment and Inequality at an Early Age: Exclusionary Discipline in Elementary School
We advance current knowledge of school punishment by examining (1) the prevalence of exclusionary discipline in elementary school, (2) racial disparities in exclusionary discipline in elementary school, and (3) the association between exclusionary discipline and aggressive behavior in elementary school. Using child and parent reports from the Fragile Families Study, we estimate that more than one in ten children born between 1998 and 2000 in large US cities were suspended or expelled by age nine, when most were in third grade. We also find extreme racial disparity; about 40 percent of non-Hispanic black boys were suspended or expelled, compared to 8 percent of non-Hispanic white or other-race boys. Disparities are largely due to differences in children’s school and home environments rather than to behavior problems. Next, consistent with social stress and strain theories, we find suspension or expulsion associated with increased aggressive behavior in elementary school. This association does not vary by race but is robust to a rich set of covariates, within-individual fixed effects, and matching methods. In conjunction with what we find for racial disparities, our results imply that school discipline policies relying heavily on exclusionary punishment may be fostering childhood inequality.
Located in MPRC People / Wade C Jacobsen, Ph.D. / Wade Jacobsen Publications
Dawn Marie Dow Releases "Mothering While Black"
Boundaries and burdens of middle-class black parenthood
Located in News
Das Gupta contributes to Azerbaijan "National Action Plan" to ensure gender equality
Solving skewed sex ratio ameliorates social tensions, may bring economic benefits
Located in News
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Intentionally or Ambivalently Risking a Short Inter-pregnancy Interval: Reproductive Readiness Factors in Women’s Postpartum Non-Use of Contraception
Michael S. Rendall, Eowna Young Harrison, Mónica Caudillo, University of Maryland; 2018-003
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Cabrera on Mothers’ and Fathers’ Playfulness
Playfulness is associated with children's emotion regulation and vocabulary skills
Located in Research / Selected Research
Seminar: Andrew Foster - Brown University
Household Recombination, Retrospective Evaluation and Educational Mobility over 40 years
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Sexual Minority Health Disparities: An Examination of Age-Related Trends Across Adulthood In a National Cross-Sectional Sample
Purpose:  Sexual minorities experience signi fi cant health disparities across a variety of mental, behav ioral, and physical health indicators. Yet, an understanding of the etiology and progression of sexual minority health disparities across the lifespan is limited. Methods:  We used the U.S. National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions III to  evaluate the association between sexual minority status and seven past-year health outcomes (alcohol  use disorder, tobacco use disorder, drug use disorder, major depressive episode, generalized anxiety  disorder, sexually transmitted infection, and cardiovascular conditions). To do this, we used unadjusted  and adjusted logistic regression among our study sample (n ¼ 30,999; aged 18 e 65 years) and time- varying effect models to evaluate how sexual orientation differences in these outcomes vary across  adulthood. Results:  Relative to heterosexuals, sexual minorities had elevated odds of past-year alcohol use disorder  and drug use disorder across all ages (18 e 65 years) although the magnitude of the disparity varies by  age. Sexual minorities were also more likely to experience major depressive episode, generalized anxiety  disorder, tobacco use disorder, sexually transmitted infection, and cardiovascular disease, but only at  speci fi c ages. Conclusions:  Sexual minority health disparities vary appreciably across the adult lifespan, thus eluci dating critical periods for focused prevention efforts.
Located in MPRC People / Jessica N Fish, Ph.D. / Jessica N Fish Publications
Article ReferenceThe Intergenerational Stability of Punishment: Paternal Incarceration and Suspension or Expulsion in Elementary School
Objectives: I extend the life-course theory of cumulative disadvantage to focus on continuity in punishment across generations. Specifically, I examine (1) the association between paternal incarceration and elementary school suspension or expulsion and (2) the extent to which behavior problems and weakened social bonds explain this association. Method: Analyses rely on logistic regression, propensity score matching, and mediation methods with data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3,201), a birth cohort of children born in large U.S. cities between 1998 and 2000. Results: The odds of school punishment among children who had a residential father incarcerated by age 5 are 75 percent greater than the odds for children in a matched control group. About one third of this association is accounted for by behavior problems and weakened social bonds. Even after accounting for behavior problems and social bonds, children whose fathers were incarcerated are at greater risk of school punishment. Conclusions: I find evidence of an intergenerational stability of punishment and mixed support for an intergenerational extension to cumulative disadvantage theory. Paternal incarceration is associated with children’s likelihood of experiencing formal punishment in elementary school, and behavior problems and weakened social bonds explain part of this association
Located in MPRC People / Wade C Jacobsen, Ph.D. / Wade Jacobsen Publications