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File Troff document (with manpage macros)Occupational Differences in Estimates of Time at Work
John P. Robinson, University of Maryland; Jonathan Gershuny, University of Oxford; 2012-006
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Deciphering Trends in American Volunteering
John P. Robinson, University of Maryland; David Horton Smith, Boston College; 2012-007
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Greg Sharp, The State University of New York at Buffalo
Activity Spaces and Adult Health: The Role of (Non)Residential Connections
Located in Coming Up
Maria Stanfors, Lund University, Sweden
Two for the price of one? Economic consequences of motherhood in contemporary Sweden.
Located in Coming Up
Sayer, Pepin research challenges single-mother time poverty
Demography article reports finding that married mothers did more housework and slept less than never-married and divorced mothers, counter to expectations of the time poverty thesis
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Marital Status and Mothers’ Time Use: Childcare, Housework, Leisure, and Sleep
Assumptions that single mothers are “time poor” compared with married mothers are ubiquitous. We tested theorized associations derived from the time poverty thesis and the gender perspective using the 2003–2012 American Time Use Surveys (ATUS). We found marital status differentiated housework, leisure, and sleep time, but did not influence the amount of time that mothers provided childcare. Net of the number of employment hours, married mothers did more housework and slept less than never-married and divorced mothers, counter to expectations of the time poverty thesis. Never-married and cohabiting mothers reported more total and more sedentary leisure time than married mothers. We assessed the influence of demographic differences among mothers to account for variation in their time use by marital status. Compositional differences explained more than two-thirds of the variance in sedentary leisure time between married and never-married mothers, but only one-third of the variance between married and cohabiting mothers. The larger unexplained gap in leisure quality between cohabiting and married mothers is consistent with the gender perspective.
Located in MPRC People / Liana C. Sayer, Ph.D. / Liana Sayer Publications
Time Use Across the Life Course
2018 Conference
Located in Coming Up
Time Use Data for Population, Health and Policy Research
Liana Sayer and Sandra Hofferth Lead Workshop
Located in Coming Up
Article ReferenceTime-use Profiles, Chronic Role Overload, and Women’s Body Weight Trajectories from Middle to Later Life in the Philippines
Although chronic life strain is often found to be associated with adverse health outcomes, empirical research is lacking on the health implications of persistent role overload that many women around the world are subject to, the so-called double burden of work and family responsibilities. Using data from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey (1994-2012), we examined the linkage between time-use profiles and body mass index (BMI) trajectories for Filipino women over an 18-year span. Out of the four classes of women with differential levels of a combination of work and family duties, the group with the heaviest double burden has the highest average BMI. In addition, those who have remained in this class for three or more waves of data not only have higher BMI on average but also have experienced the steepest rate of increase in BMI upon transition from midlife to old age.
Located in MPRC People / Feinian Chen, Ph.D. / Feinian Chen Publications
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Daily Life among American Immigrants
John P. Robinson, University of Maryland, et al.; 2012-005
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents