Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

You are here: Home

Search results

12 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type









































New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Cabrera's work featured on MedicalXpress.com
Family cohesion, discipline, and strong ethnic identity help low-income kids succeed
Located in News
Hofferth study challenges common wisdom about single parenting
Income level, not family structure, has the biggest impact on parenting practices
Located in News
Article ReferenceBehavioral and Emotional Development of African American Boys Growing Up in Risky Environments
Black males experience extraordinary developmental risks as a consequence of the combined effects of male gender, poverty, and race. These risks are reflected in atypical behavioral and emotional development often observed in middle childhood. Not all Black males succumb to these risks. Whether or not they do is a function of exposure to adverse childhood events resulting from poverty, the experience of racial bias, and access to mitigating cultural resources and familial supports. Reducing household poverty and increasing access to early childhood programs, school‐based programs, and mentoring are promising interventions to increase the probability of positive outcomes.
Located in MPRC People / Oscar Barbarin, Ph.D. / Oscar Barbarin Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Individual- and Family-Level Correlates of Socio-Emotional Functioning among African American Youth from Single-Mother Homes: A Compensatory Resilience Model
The majority of research on African American adolescents raised in single-mother homes has focused on externalizing problems, with less attention to other facets of socio-emotional functioning. Using a compensatory resilience approach, the current study examined risk and protective factors at the family (maternal warmth, monitoring, psychological control) and youth (ethnic identity and religiosity) levels as predictors of depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and self-esteem among African American adolescents from single-mother homes ( n  = 193). Lower levels of psychological control, higher levels of monitoring, and higher levels of youth ethnic identity were associated with at least one of the outcomes, depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and self-esteem. In addition, self-esteem, but not hopelessness, mediated the associations between the family- and youth-level factors and youth depressive symptoms. The importance of targeting maternal psychological control and youth ethnic identity, as well as self-esteem, in intervention programs for African American youth from single-mother families is discussed.
Located in MPRC People / Cecily Hardaway, Ph.D. / Cecily Hardaway Publications
How Does Time Use Data Illuminate Important Social Patterns?
Liana Sayer starts a new Time Use Lab at the University of Maryland
Located in Research / Selected Research
Race, Gender, and Educational Achievement
Odis Johnson investigates how social issues affect education
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Quantiles of the Gain Distribution of an Early Childhood Intervention
We offer a new strategy to identify the distribution of treatment effects using data from the Infant Health and Development Program (IHDP), a relatively understudied early-childhood intervention for low birth-weight infants. We introduce a new policy parameter, QCD, which denotes quantiles of the effect distribution conditional on latent neonatal health. The dependence between potential outcomes originates from a new class of factor models where latent health can affect the location and shape of distributions. We first show that QCD depends on quantiles of marginal outcome distributions given latent health. We then achieve identification of these marginal distributions and QCD by proxying latent health with neonatal anthropometrics and accounting for measurement error in these proxies. The effects of enrolling in IHDP are widely distributed across children and depend on neonatal health. Moreover, the large average effects documented in past work for close to normal birth weight children from low-income families are driven by a minority of children in this group.
Located in MPRC People / Erich Battistin, Ph.D. / Erich Battistin Publications
Moussa Blimpo, World Bank
Scaling Up School Readiness: Experimental Evidence from The Gambia
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Risk Tolerance and Parental Investment in Children
Jeffrey Borowitz, Student Scholar, Department of Economics, University of Maryland
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Parental Age and Cognitive Disability Among Children in the United States
Philip N. Cohen, Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Maryland
Located in Coming Up