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File Troff document (with manpage macros)"Missing Girls" in the South Caucasus Countries: Trends, Possible Causes, and Policy Options
Monica Das Gupta, University of Maryland // Keywords: Gender, Poverty, Economic Shocks, Social Protection, Governance, Health, Population; JEL codes: D13, H31, H55, J13, J16, P31; 2017-004
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Assessing the Impact of Local Violence on Teenage Fertility: The Case of Mexico
Mónica Caudillo, Maryland Population Research Center // Key words: Adolescents, Crime, Violence, Demography, Fertility; 2017-006
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
The Role of Fathers in the Transition to Adulthood for Young Men in Urban South Africa
Sangeetha Madhavan, African American Studies Department
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Love, money, and parental goods: Does parental matchmaking matter?
While parental matchmaking has been widespread throughout history and across countries, we know little about the relationship between parental matchmaking and marriage outcomes. Does parental involvement in matchmaking help ensure their needs are better taken care of by married children? This paper finds supportive evidence using a survey of Chinese couples. In particular, parental involvement in matchmaking is associated with having a more submissive wife, a greater number of children, a higher likelihood of having any male children, and a stronger belief of the husband in providing old age support to his parents. These benefits, however, are achieved at the cost of less marital harmony within the couple and lower market income of the wife. The results render support to and extend the findings of Becker, Murphy and Spenkuch (2015) where parents meddle with children's preferences to ensure their commitment to providing parental goods such as old age support.
Located in MPRC People / Ginger Zhe Jin, Ph.D. / Ginger Zhe Jin Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The cost of access: Racial disparities in student loan burdens of young adults
Student loans have become a social-financial issue in the United States. This study uses a nationally representative dataset to examine the association between financial socialization and student loan borrowing behavior of individuals after controlling a number of different socio-demographic factors. Results show that the financial burdens of college education, such as borrowing and the dollar amounts of a loan, are higher for Blacks, however, their college attendance is significantly lower than Whites. Blacks are more independent and receive less financial support from family and relatives than Whites. The wealth gap that exists between Black and White parents may contribute to the disparity. Additional financial resources for higher education as well as financial education and counseling may be needed to create better academic access for the vulnerable underserved groups including minority students.
Located in MPRC People / Jinhee Kim, Ph.D. / JinHee Kim Publications
Cohen notes complex decision-making around pregnancy
COVID-19 "baby bust" will have long term effects
Located in News
Adriana Lleras-Muney, UCLA
Intergenerational Correlations in Longevity
Located in Coming Up
Cohen comments on birth declines in some states
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Challenging Stereotypes: A Counter-Narrative of the Contraceptive Experiences of Low-Income Latinas
Purpose: Reproductive autonomy is associated with educational attainment, advanced employment, and wellbeing. While U.S. Latinas use contraception to control their own childbearing and have reported a desire to do so, they often use it inconsistently and have the lowest rates of contraceptive use of any group. Reasons previously cited for why Latinas do not use contraception compared with non-Latino white women include lack of access, lack of knowledge, language barriers, emphasis on large families, machismo, and religiosity. These reasons are often overly simplistic and can lead to widespread generalizations about Latinas. Methods: Using focus groups and semistructured interviews from November 2014 through June 2015, this study describes the family planning perspectives and experiences of 16 Latinas living in Baltimore and recruited from two federally qualified health centers. A social determinant of health framework was used to guide identification of important concepts and explain findings. Results: Results demonstrated that respondents reported contraceptive agency and claimed autonomy over their bodies; described a sense of responsibility and often expressed caution about having families too large to care for; expressed educational and career aspirations; and perceived contraception as critical for the postponement of childbearing to achieve their goals. Conclusion: The patient/provider encounter should include communication that recognizes all patient preferences and lived experiences to support vulnerable and/or marginalized Latinas in their desires to control their own childbearing and life choices.
Located in Retired Persons / Ruth Zambrana, Ph.D. / Ruth Zambrana Publications
Kearney comments on Universal Basic Income for children story
Wall Street Journal
Located in News