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Philip Cohen comments on Americans' dropping divorce rate on NPR
Divorce has become more acceptable, less stigmatized, but also less common
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The Role of Social Support in Moderating the Relationship between Race and Hypertension in a Low-Income, Urban, Racially Integrated Community
In the US, African Americans have a higher prevalence of hypertension than Whites. Previous studies show that social support contributes to the racial differences in hypertension but are limited in accounting for the social and environmental effects of racial residential segregation. We examined whether the association between race and hypertension varies by the level of social support among African Americans and Whites living in similar social and environmental conditions, specifically an urban, low-income, racially integrated community. Using data from the Exploring Health Disparities in Integrated Communities-Southwest Baltimore (EHDIC-SWB) sample, we hypothesized that social support moderates the relationship between race and hypertension and the racial difference in hypertension is smaller as the level of social support increases. Hypertension was defined as having systolic blood pressure greater than 140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure greater than 90 mmHg, or the participant reports of taking antihypertensive medication(s). The study only included participants that self-reported as “Black/African American” or “White.” Social support was measured as functional social support and marital status. After adjusting for demographics and health-related characteristics, we found no interaction between social support and race (DUFSS score, prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.99, 1.01; marital status, prevalence ratio 1.02; 95% confidence interval 0.86, 1.21); thus the hypothesis was not supported. A plausible explanation is that the buffering factor of social support cannot overcome the social and environmental conditions which the participants live in. Further, these findings emphasize social and environmental conditions of participants in EHDIC-SWB may equally impact race and hypertension.
Located in MPRC People / Caryn Bell, Ph.D. / Caryn Bell Publications
Rashawn Ray comments on police-community relations
Fox 5 Washington D.C. program examines (non)use of cameras in Prince Georges County
Located in News
Trends in stratification of pre-marital childbirth
Kirsten Stoebenau and Sangeetha Madhavan examine impact of economic inequality through NICHD R03
Located in Research / Selected Research
Using IHDS Data to Explore Inequality in India
Sonalde Desai and Reeve Vanneman study the "Determinants of Maternal and Child Health in India"
Located in Research / Selected Research
Intergenerational Parenting and Health
MPRC Associate Terrence Thornberry is studying Intergenerational Health using the Rochester Youth Development Study
Located in Research / Selected Research
How Does Parental Stress Affect Child Outcomes?
Natasha Cabrera has completed a paper on “Parenting and early predictors of Latino children’s cognitive and social development: Direct and Indirect Effects”
Located in Research / Selected Research
Institutional Context: Schools and Child Development
Melissa Milkie is completing an NICHD-funded project on “Social statuses, schools, and children’s problems”
Located in Research / Selected Research
Shifts in Racial / Ethnic and Gender Composition in the Military
Social structure, social systems and social networks with applications to military personnel and operational issues
Located in Research / Selected Research
India Human Development Survey Second Wave (IDHS-II)
An NICHD grant valued at about $2.5 million over five years is funding the second wave of survey research for IHDS
Located in Research / Selected Research