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Haltiwanger research informs Forbes labor market predictions
Notes strong new business formation
Located in News
Adrienne Lucas, University of Delaware
When Information is Not Enough: Evidence from a Centralized School Choice System
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros) Blatant, Subtle and Insidious: URM Faculty Perceptions of Discriminatory Practices in Predominantly White Institutions
Although modest gains are observed in the number of African American, Mexican American, and Puerto Rican faculty in higher education institutions, systemic issues of underrepresentation and retention remain problematic. This article describes how historically underrepresented minority (URM) faculty in Predominantly White Institutions perceive discrimination and illustrates the ways in which discriminatory institutional practices—such as microaggressions—manifest and contribute to unwelcoming institutional climates and workplace stress. Using a mixed methods approach, including survey data and individual and group interviews, findings show that respondents ( n  = 543) encounter racial discrimination from colleagues and administrators; experience discrimination differently based on their race/ethnicity and gender; and report difficulties in describing racist encounters. Qualitative data reveal three themes that inform the survey results on perceived discrimination: (1) blatant, outright, subtle, and insidious racism; (2) devaluation of scholarly contributions, merit, and skillset by colleagues and administrators; and (3) the burden of “representing minorities,” or a “racial/ethnic tax.” Propositions for how to change unwelcoming environments and create safe spaces for professional development to reduce the adverse effects of discrimination among URM faculty are discussed.
Located in Retired Persons / Ruth Zambrana, Ph.D. / Ruth Zambrana Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)"How Do You Advance Here? How do You Survive?" An Exploration of Under-Represented Minority Faculty Perceptions of Mentoring Modalities
This article contrasts perceptions among 58 under-represented minority (URM) faculty employed at U.S. research-extensive universities who reported an absence of mentoring or experienced informal or formal mentoring modalities. Key findings reveal a mentoring glass ceiling that affects URM faculty career paths: an absence of mentoring can lead to significant career miscalculations; well-intentioned mentors can devalue faculty scholarship; lack of senior faculty accountability for observed disengagement from faculty career development; and inadequate mentorship often limits access to social networks and collaborative research opportunities. Recommendations are offered for developing effective formal mentoring initiatives that reflect an institutional investment in early-career URM faculty.
Located in Retired Persons / Ruth Zambrana, Ph.D. / Ruth Zambrana Publications
Kearney cited in analysis of child poverty crisis
Support for families makes economic as well as social sense
Located in News
Rashawn Ray one of five scholars featured in Washington Post
Report from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute at Johns Hopkins University
Located in News
Econ Seminar: Tim Bartik, Upjohn Institute
How Place-Based Jobs Policies Help Distressed Communities
Located in Coming Up
Kearney comments on Universal Basic Income for children story
Wall Street Journal
Located in News
Econ Seminar: Caterina Calsamiglia, Barcelona Graduate School
The Design of University Entrance Exams and its Implications for Gender Gaps
Located in Coming Up
Haltiwanger job data support CNBC story
Millennials and Gen Z workers are changing positions a bit more frequently
Located in News