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File Troff document (with manpage macros)The role of weight perception in race differences in body mass index by education among women
Caryn N. Bell University of Maryland: Loneke T. Blackman Carr Duke University: 2019-006
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
File Troff document (with manpage macros)The Short- and Medium-Term Impacts of Household Water Supply and Sanitation on Diarrhea in Rural India
Raymond Guiteras, University of Maryland; Esther Duflo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Michael Greenstone, University of Chicago; Thomas Clasen, Emory University; 2015-008
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Theodore Joyce, Baruch College
The Impact of Parental Involvement Laws on the Abortion Rate of Minors
Located in Coming Up
Thurka Sangaramoorthy featured in The Baltimore Sun on Maryland Crab Workers during COVID-19
This year’s crabbing season is fraught with difficult choices for the nearly all-foreign-women workers during the pandemic hit
Located in News
Tim Dyson, London School of Economics & Political Science
Global Warming and the Demographic Future
Located in Coming Up
Time Use Across the Life Course Conference
Located in Coming Up
Time Use Across the Life Course
2018 Conference
Located in Coming Up
Article ReferenceTime-use Profiles, Chronic Role Overload, and Women’s Body Weight Trajectories from Middle to Later Life in the Philippines
Although chronic life strain is often found to be associated with adverse health outcomes, empirical research is lacking on the health implications of persistent role overload that many women around the world are subject to, the so-called double burden of work and family responsibilities. Using data from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey (1994-2012), we examined the linkage between time-use profiles and body mass index (BMI) trajectories for Filipino women over an 18-year span. Out of the four classes of women with differential levels of a combination of work and family duties, the group with the heaviest double burden has the highest average BMI. In addition, those who have remained in this class for three or more waves of data not only have higher BMI on average but also have experienced the steepest rate of increase in BMI upon transition from midlife to old age.
Located in Retired Persons / Feinian Chen, Ph.D. / Feinian Chen Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Tobacco smoking, chewing habits, alcohol drinking and the risk of head and neck cancer in Nepal
Although tobacco smoking, pan chewing and alcohol drinking are important risk factors for head and neck cancer (HNC), the HNC risks conferred by products available in Nepal for these habits are unknown. We assessed the associations of tobacco smoking, chewing habits, and alcohol drinking with HNC risk in Nepal. A case–control study was conducted in Nepal with 549 incident HNC cases and 601 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression adjusting for potential confounders. We observed increased HNC risk for tobacco smoking (OR: 1.54; 95% CI: 1.14, 2.06), chewing habits (OR: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.77, 3.23), and alcohol drinking (OR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.14, 2.18). The population attributable fraction (PAF) was 24.3% for tobacco smoking, 39.9% for chewing habits and 23.0% for alcohol drinking. Tobacco smoking, chewing habits, and alcohol drinking might be responsible for 85.3% of HNC cases. Individuals who smoked tobacco, chewed products and drank alcohol had a 13‐fold increase in HNC risk (OR: 12.83; 95% CI: 6.91, 23.81) compared to individuals who did not have any of these habits. Both high frequency and long duration of these habits were strong risk factors for HNC among the Nepalese with clear dose–response trends. Preventive strategies against starting these habits and support for quitting these habits are necessary to decrease the incidence of HNC in Nepal.
Located in MPRC People / Amir Sapkota, Ph.D. / Amir Sapkota Publications
Article ReferenceTop 10 Blockchain Predictions for the (Near) Future of Healthcare
To review blockchain lessons learned in 2018 and near-future predictions for blockchain in healthcare, Blockchain in Healthcare Today (BHTY) asked the world's blockchain in healthcare experts to share their insights. Here, our internationally-renowned BHTY peer-review board discusses their major predictions. Based on their responses, presented in detail below, ten major themes (Table ) for the future of blockchain in healthcare will emerge over the 12 months.
Located in MPRC People / Manouchehr (Mitch) Mokhtari, Ph.D. / Mitch Mokhtari Publications