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Hongjie Liu appointed to Montgomery County COVID Advisory Board
Will continue work on models for tracking and responding to the pandemic
Located in News
Incollection Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The Informative Role of Advertising and Experience in Dynamic Brand Choice: an Application to the Ready-to-Eat Cereal Market
We study how consumers make brand choices when they have limited information. In a market of experience goods with frequent product entry and exit, consumers face two types of information problems: first, they have limited information about a product’s existence; second, even if they know a product exists, they do not have full information about its quality until they purchase and consume it. In this chapter, we incorporate purchase experience and brand advertising as two sources of information and examine how consumers use them in a dynamic process. The model is estimated using the Nielsen Homescan data in Los Angeles, which consist of grocery shopping history for 1,402 households over 6 years. Taking ready-to-eat cereal as an example, we find that consumers learn about new products quickly and form strong habits. More specifically, advertising has a significant effect in informing consumers of a product’s existence and signaling product quality. However, advertising’s prestige effect is not significant. We also find that incorporating limited information about a product’s existence leads to larger estimates of the price elasticity. Based on the structural estimates, we simulate consumer choices under three counterfactual experiments to evaluate brand marketing strategies and a policy on banning children-oriented cereal advertising. Simulation suggests that the advertising ban encourages consumers to consume less sugar and more fiber, but their expenditures are also higher because they switch to family and adult brands, which are more expensive.
Located in MPRC People / Ginger Zhe Jin, Ph.D. / Ginger Zhe Jin Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Optimal Aggregation of Consumer Ratings: An Application to Yelp.com
Because consumer reviews leverage the wisdom of the crowd, the way in which they are aggregated is a central decision faced by platforms. We explore this "rating aggregation problem" and offer a structural approach to solving it, allowing for (1) reviewers to vary in stringency and accuracy, (2) reviewers to be influenced by existing reviews, and (3) product quality to change over time. Applying this to restaurant reviews from Yelp.com, we construct an adjusted average rating and show that even a simple algorithm can lead to large information efficiency gains relative to the arithmetic average.
Located in MPRC People / Ginger Zhe Jin, Ph.D. / Ginger Zhe Jin Publications
Seminar: Danny Schneider - UC Berkeley
Unstable and Unpredictable Work Schedules: Effects on Wellbeing and What to Do About It
Located in Coming Up
Seminar: Julia Steinberg - Family Science, School of Public Health, UMD
Examining the Association Between Abortion and Mental Health: The (Mis)use of Science in Policy
Located in Coming Up
Seminar: Trevon Logan - The Ohio State University and NBER
Racial Disparities in Health: Physician Bias and Veterans’ Pensions
Located in Coming Up
SPH Study Explores Maternal Experience of IPV in Young Children in Tanzania
Natalie Slopen and colleagues published a new study exploring the health implications of intimate partner violence on children
Located in Research / Selected Research
More Women Opting to Give Birth Outside of a Hospital
Data shows rate of births at home and in birth centers reaches highest level in 30 years; demand may actually be greater
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Behavioral health treatment utilization among individuals with co-occurring opioid use disorder and mental illness: Evidence from a national survey
BACKGROUND: Past research shows that among individuals with substance use disorders, the presence of a co-occurring mental illness can influence the initiation, course, and success of behavioral health treatment, but little research has examined people with opioid use disorder (OUD) specifically. METHODS: Using the 2008-2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, this study examines the utilization of substance use disorder and mental health treatment among individuals with OUD and different degrees of mental illness severity. The study also examined types of treatment, perceived unmet need for treatment, and barriers to care. RESULTS: 47% of individuals with OUD and co-occurring mild/moderate mental illness did not receive any behavioral health treatment, and 21% of those with co-occurring serious mental illnesses did not receive any behavioral health treatment. Among those with OUD and co-occurring mild/moderate mental illness, 16% reported receiving both substance use disorder and mental health treatment; among those with co-occurring serious mental illness the rate was 32%. The most common form of treatment was prescription medication for mental health, and this was true regardless of whether or not the individual had any mental illness. More than 50% of the study population reported financial difficulties as a barrier to treatment. CONCLUSION: A high proportion of individuals with OUD and co-occurring mental illness are not receiving needed care. However, nearly one in five of those with OUD but no diagnosed mental illness is receiving prescription medication for mental illness. These findings suggest that there is a need to better facilitate access to and coordinate behavioral health care across settings for individuals with OUD. Published by Elsevier Inc.
Located in MPRC People / Jie Chen, Ph.D. / Jie Chen Publications
For Young Women in Sub-Saharan Africa Addressing Transactional Sex May be Key to Reducing HIV Infections
Transactional Sex and HIV Risk: From Analysis to Action
Located in Research / Selected Research