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FileMarital Status and Mothers’ Time Use: Childcare, Housework, Leisure, and Sleep
Liana C. Sayer and Joanna R. Pepin, University of Maryland; Lynne M. Casper, University of Southern California // Keywords: time use, mother, leisure, marital status; 2015-010
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Marital Status and Mothers’ Time Use: Childcare, Housework, Leisure, and Sleep
Assumptions that single mothers are “time poor” compared with married mothers are ubiquitous. We tested theorized associations derived from the time poverty thesis and the gender perspective using the 2003–2012 American Time Use Surveys (ATUS). We found marital status differentiated housework, leisure, and sleep time, but did not influence the amount of time that mothers provided childcare. Net of the number of employment hours, married mothers did more housework and slept less than never-married and divorced mothers, counter to expectations of the time poverty thesis. Never-married and cohabiting mothers reported more total and more sedentary leisure time than married mothers. We assessed the influence of demographic differences among mothers to account for variation in their time use by marital status. Compositional differences explained more than two-thirds of the variance in sedentary leisure time between married and never-married mothers, but only one-third of the variance between married and cohabiting mothers. The larger unexplained gap in leisure quality between cohabiting and married mothers is consistent with the gender perspective.
Located in MPRC People / Liana C. Sayer, Ph.D. / Liana Sayer Publications
Marsh outlines challenges facing African American women
Marrying a less-educated partner can cost $25,000 per year
Located in News
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Maternal Age and Infant Mortality for White, Black, and Mexican Mothers in the United States
Philip N. Cohen, University of Maryland; 2015-014
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Article ReferenceMaternal postpartum depressive symptoms and infant externalizing and internalizing behaviors
Maternal postpartum depression has been shown to be one of the main predictors of externalizing and internalizing behaviors in toddlers and adolescents. Research suggests that presence of such behaviors can be observed as early as infancy. The current study uses longitudinal data from 247 mothers to examine the relationship between postpartum depressive symptoms at 8 weeks and the infant's externalizing and internalizing behaviors at 12 months. In unadjusted linear regression models, there were associations between postpartum depressive symptoms and infant externalizing behaviors (β=0.082, SE=0.032, p=0.012) and internalizing behaviors (β=0.111, SE=0.037, p=0.003). After controlling for potential confounding factors, including maternal age, race, education, home ownership, smoking status in the postpartum period, marital status, parenting stress, and happiness from becoming a parent, the associations between postpartum depressive symptoms and infant externalizing (β=0.051, SE=0.034, p=0.138) and internalizing behaviors (β=0.077, SE=0.040, p=0.057) were reduced and became non-significant. Furthermore, in these models the total amount of variance explained was 17.2% (p<0.0001) for externalizing behaviors and 10.5% (p<0.01) for internalizing behaviors; the only significant predictor of externalizing behaviors was maternal age (β=-0.074, SE=0.030, p=0.014), and of internalizing behaviors was white non-Hispanic ethnicity (β=-1.33, SE=0.378, p=0.0005). A combined effect of the confounding factors seems to explain the finding of no significant independent association between postpartum depressive symptoms and infant externalizing and internalizing behaviors.
Located in MPRC People / Edmond Shenassa, Ph.D. / Edmond Shenassa Publications
Measuring Kinship Support for Children of Single Mothers
Sangeetha Madhavan investigates the effects of social and economic change on children's lives in Nairobi
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Medicaid Benefit Generosity and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Medicaid Adult Vision Benefits
This paper examines whether Medicaid adult vision coverage affects labor market activity using state-by-year changes to these benefits.We find that vision benefits increase hours worked and occupational skill requirements, but no consistent evidence of changes on the extensive employment margin. Intensive margin effects could be facilitated by decreased barriers to transportation - when a state covers vision services, beneficiaries are more likely to commute to work by car or motorcycle rather than other modes. Our study suggests that, conditional on eligibility, Medicaid can have a positive effect on labor market activity by expanding access to services that enable work. JEL codes:I13, I18, J22, H75. Link to online-before-print version
Located in MPRC People / Michel Boudreaux, Ph.D. / Michel Boudreaux Publications
Medication and procedural abortions before 13 weeks gestation and risk of psychiatric disorders
Faculty Associate Julia Steinberg and colleaguse set out to test risks associated with having a medication or procedural abortion prior to 13 weeks of pregnancy
Located in Research / Selected Research
Melanie Wasserman, UCLA Anderson School of Management
Informed Choices: Gender Gaps in Career Advice
Located in Coming Up
Melissa Kearney evaluates pandemic birth rates in Time Magazine
Family planning in an era of psychological and economic strife
Located in News