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Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Children’s Adjustment to Parents’ Breakup: The Mediational Effects of Parenting and Coparenting
Although past studies have shown an association between union instability (i.e., change in family structure) and children’s aggressive behaviors, the mechanism by which this occurs is less understood. This study ( N  = 3,387) examined whether father and mother involvement, coparenting support, and maternal responsiveness explained the association between union instability in early life and children’s aggressive behaviors at 9 years, and whether relationship status moderated this association. Findings reveal that only coparenting support mediated this association and only for children whose mothers divorced (not for mothers who experienced a nonmarital separation), suggesting that when a divorce occurs, the relationship between partners (coparenting) is more important than the relationship with children (parenting) for children’s social adjustment.
Located in MPRC People / Natasha Cabrera, Ph.D. / Natasha Cabrera Publications
Marian MacDorman featured in Vox on Maternal Mortality Rate
U.S. lags behind in terms of maternal mortality rate
Located in News
Trends in stratification of pre-marital childbirth
Kirsten Stoebenau and Sangeetha Madhavan examine impact of economic inequality through NICHD R03
Located in Research / Selected Research
MPRC Seed Grant funding increased
New maximum of $20,000
Located in News
Article ReferenceMaternal postpartum depressive symptoms and infant externalizing and internalizing behaviors
Maternal postpartum depression has been shown to be one of the main predictors of externalizing and internalizing behaviors in toddlers and adolescents. Research suggests that presence of such behaviors can be observed as early as infancy. The current study uses longitudinal data from 247 mothers to examine the relationship between postpartum depressive symptoms at 8 weeks and the infant's externalizing and internalizing behaviors at 12 months. In unadjusted linear regression models, there were associations between postpartum depressive symptoms and infant externalizing behaviors (β=0.082, SE=0.032, p=0.012) and internalizing behaviors (β=0.111, SE=0.037, p=0.003). After controlling for potential confounding factors, including maternal age, race, education, home ownership, smoking status in the postpartum period, marital status, parenting stress, and happiness from becoming a parent, the associations between postpartum depressive symptoms and infant externalizing (β=0.051, SE=0.034, p=0.138) and internalizing behaviors (β=0.077, SE=0.040, p=0.057) were reduced and became non-significant. Furthermore, in these models the total amount of variance explained was 17.2% (p<0.0001) for externalizing behaviors and 10.5% (p<0.01) for internalizing behaviors; the only significant predictor of externalizing behaviors was maternal age (β=-0.074, SE=0.030, p=0.014), and of internalizing behaviors was white non-Hispanic ethnicity (β=-1.33, SE=0.378, p=0.0005). A combined effect of the confounding factors seems to explain the finding of no significant independent association between postpartum depressive symptoms and infant externalizing and internalizing behaviors.
Located in MPRC People / Edmond Shenassa, Ph.D. / Edmond Shenassa Publications
Emily Wiemers, University of Massachusetts
Multigenerational Relationships and Economic Resources Among Black and White Families in the US
Located in Coming Up
Jamie Trevitt, University of Maryland Baltimore County
Post-abortion Contraception Preference
Located in Coming Up
Susan Parker, CIDE (Mexico)
Can conditional transfers reduce poverty of the next generation? Evidence from young adults after 15 years of a Mexican program
Located in Coming Up
File Troff document (with manpage macros)The role of weight perception in race differences in body mass index by education among women
Caryn N. Bell University of Maryland: Loneke T. Blackman Carr Duke University: 2019-006
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Advanced School Progression Relative to Age and Early Family Formation in Mexico
Research has documented a negative association between women’s educational attainment and early sexual intercourse, union formation, and pregnancy. However, the implications that school progression relative to age may have for the timing and order of such transitions are poorly understood. In this article, I argue that educational attainment has different implications depending on a student’s progression through school grades relative to her age. Using month of birth and age-at-school-entry policies to estimate the effect of advanced school progression by age, I show that it accelerates the occurrence of family formation and sexual onset among teenage women in Mexico. Focusing on girls aged 15–17 interviewed by a national survey, I find that those who progress through school ahead of their birth cohort have a higher probability of having had sex, been pregnant, and cohabited by the time of interview. I argue that this pattern of behaviors is explained by experiences that lead them to accelerate their transition to adulthood compared with same-age students with fewer completed school grades, such as exposure to relatively older peers in school and completing academic milestones earlier in life. Among girls who got pregnant, those with an advanced school progression by age are more likely to engage in drug use, alcohol consumption, and smoking before conception; more likely to have pregnancy-related health complications; and less likely to attend prenatal care visits. Thus, an advanced school progression by age has substantial implications for the health and well-being of young women, with potential intergenerational consequences.
Located in MPRC People / Monica Caudillo, Ph.D. / Monica Caudillo Publications