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State of Hispanic Race and Ethnicity: Census 2020 Changes and Implications For Addressing Social Inequalities
Half-day Conference by Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity and co-sponsored with MPRC
Located in Coming Up
Journal Club Meeting with Natalie Slopen
Maternal experiences of ethnic discrimination and child cardiometabolic outcomes in the Study of Latino (SOL) Youth
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Challenging Stereotypes: A Counter-Narrative of the Contraceptive Experiences of Low-Income Latinas
Purpose: Reproductive autonomy is associated with educational attainment, advanced employment, and wellbeing. While U.S. Latinas use contraception to control their own childbearing and have reported a desire to do so, they often use it inconsistently and have the lowest rates of contraceptive use of any group. Reasons previously cited for why Latinas do not use contraception compared with non-Latino white women include lack of access, lack of knowledge, language barriers, emphasis on large families, machismo, and religiosity. These reasons are often overly simplistic and can lead to widespread generalizations about Latinas. Methods: Using focus groups and semistructured interviews from November 2014 through June 2015, this study describes the family planning perspectives and experiences of 16 Latinas living in Baltimore and recruited from two federally qualified health centers. A social determinant of health framework was used to guide identification of important concepts and explain findings. Results: Results demonstrated that respondents reported contraceptive agency and claimed autonomy over their bodies; described a sense of responsibility and often expressed caution about having families too large to care for; expressed educational and career aspirations; and perceived contraception as critical for the postponement of childbearing to achieve their goals. Conclusion: The patient/provider encounter should include communication that recognizes all patient preferences and lived experiences to support vulnerable and/or marginalized Latinas in their desires to control their own childbearing and life choices.
Located in MPRC People / Ruth Zambrana, Ph.D. / Ruth Zambrana Publications
Ruth Zambrana to Study Latina Entrepreneurs
3 year study to collect data from six states in the U.S.
Located in Research / Selected Research
Early Home Experiences of Young Latino Boys
Why research on low-income Latino children really matters
Located in Research / Selected Research
Respect Yourself, Protect Yourself: Latina girls and sexual identity
Dr. Lorena Garcia, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago
Located in Coming Up