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What is behind gender inequality in college ?
Women are completing university in greater percentages than men but do not choose high-income fields
Located in News
American Educational Research Association honors Odis Johnson
AERA Announces 2013 Award Winners in Education Research
Located in News
Cabrera's work featured on MedicalXpress.com
Family cohesion, discipline, and strong ethnic identity help low-income kids succeed
Located in News
Odis Johnson quoted in the Washington Post
Schools for English-language learners may help close the achievement gap in Prince George’s County
Located in News
Kearney and Levine study identifies Sesame Street education boon
Effect pronounced for boys, African Americans, and children in disadvantaged areas
Located in News
Article ReferenceThe Shifting Salience of Skin Color for Educational Attainment
Findings of an association between skin color and educational attainment have been fairly consistent among Americans born before the civil rights era, but little is known regarding the persistence of this relationship in later born cohorts. The authors ask whether the association between skin color and educational attainment has changed between black American baby boomers and millennials. The authors observe a large and statistically significant decline in the association between skin color and educational attainment between baby boomer and millennial black women, whereas the decline in this association between the two cohorts of black men is smaller and nonsignificant. Compared with baby boomers, a greater percentage of the association between skin color and educational attainment among black millennials appears to reflect educational disparities in previous generations. These results emphasize the need to conceptualize colorism as an intersectional problem and suggest caution when generalizing evidence of colorism in earlier cohorts to young adults today.
Located in MPRC People / Amelia Branigan, Ph.D. / Amelia Branigan Publications
Race, Gender, and Educational Achievement
Odis Johnson investigates how social issues affect education
Located in Research / Selected Research
Dylan Conger, George Washington University
The Effect of Advanced Placement Science on Students' Skills, Confidence, and Stress
Located in Coming Up
Add Health Primer: Data overview and access mechanisms
Luciana Assini-Meytin, Behavioral and Community Health; Sarbartha Bandyopadhyay, MPRC
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Timing is Everything: Evidence from College Major Decisons
People rely on their experiences when making important decisions. In making these decisions, individuals may be significantly influenced by the timing of their experiences. Using administrative data, we study whether the order in which students are assigned courses affects the choice of college major. We use a natural experiment at the United States Military Academy in which students are randomly assigned to certain courses either during or after the semester in which they are required to select their college major. We find that when students are assigned to a course in the same semester as they select a major, they are over 100 percent more likely to choose a major that corresponds to that course. Despite low switching costs, approximately half of the effect persists through graduation. Our results demonstrate that the timing of when students are assigned courses has a large and persistent effect on college major choice. We explore several potential mechanisms for these results and find that students’ initial major choice best fits a framework we develop that incorporates salience and availability. Furthermore, our results suggest that once students select a major, they are less likely to switch majors than the standard model of economic choice predicts. Instead, students’ decision to remain in a major is more consistent with status quo bias.
Located in MPRC People / Nolan Pope, Ph.D. / Nolan Pope Publications