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Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Low-income Latino mothers’ and fathers’ control strategies and toddler compliance.
We explored children’s compliance to their mothers’ and fathers’ control strategies in a sample of 49 Latino toddlers and their immigrant parents during a cleanup task. We report 3 sets of findings. First, both mothers and fathers primarily used direct and indirect commands to elicit compliance. Second, there was no difference in the type of control strategies mothers and fathers used with their daughters versus sons. Mothers who used praise and indirect commands had children who complied more, whereas mothers who used direct commands and incentives had children who were less compliant. Toddlers were more compliant to their fathers than mothers, and girls were more compliant to their mothers than were boys. Third, mothers who used more direct control strategies also strongly endorsed the value of respeto. These findings highlight the importance of examining the variation in Latino mothers’ and fathers’ control strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
Located in MPRC People / Natasha Cabrera, Ph.D. / Natasha Cabrera Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Decision rightness and relief predominate over the years following an abortion
A recent analysis from the Turnaway study focused on women who were just under the gestational limit of a clinic and received an abortion and those who had first trimester abortions to examine trends in decisional rightness and negative and positive emotions over 5 years after the abortion. Specifically, Rocca et al. (in press) analyzed these data and found that women were overwhemingly sure of their decision: 95% felt their decision was the right one at each assessment after their abortion, and the predicted probability of abortion being the right decision was 99% at 5 years afterwards. Relief was the most common emotion felt by women, and negative emotions or decision regret did not emerge over time. These results and others from studies conducted globally counter assertions by abortion opponents that women are not certain of their decisions, or that women regret or have mainly negative emotions about their abortions if not in the short run then after a long period of time. This commentary addresses not only these findings but also relevant U.S. abortion policies based on these unsubstantiated claims. Policies should not be based on the notions that women are unsure of their decision, come to regret, it or have negative emotions because there is no evidence to support these claims.
Located in MPRC People / Julia Steinberg, Ph.D. / Julia Steinberg Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Cohort Increases In Sex With Same-Sex Partners: Do Trends Vary by Gender, Race, and Class?
We examine change across U.S. cohorts born between 1920 and 2000 in their probability of having had sex with same-sex partners in the last year and since age 18. Using data from the 1988–2018 General Social Surveys, we explore how trends differ by gender, race, and class background. We find steep increases across birth cohorts in the proportion of women who have had sex with both men and women since age 18, whereas increases for men are less steep. We suggest that the trends reflect an increasingly accepting social climate, and that women’s steeper trend is rooted in a long-term asymmetry in gender change, in which nonconformity to gender norms is more acceptable for women than men. We also find evidence that, among men, the increase in having had sex with both men and women was steeper for black than for white men, and for men of lower socioeconomic status; we speculate that the rise of mass incarceration among less privileged men may have influenced this trend.
Located in MPRC People / Monica Caudillo, Ph.D. / Monica Caudillo Publications
Kevin Roy Comments on Stay-at-home Dads on Baltimore Magazine
Stay-at-home dads are more gender equitable, holding positive thoughts about themselves and their wives
Located in News
Hofferth on housework disproportion
Gender disparities start at home
Located in News
Methodological Issues in Maternal Mortality Research
NICHD R21 project seeks to clarify maternal mortality records
Located in Research / Selected Research
Using IHDS Data to Explore Inequality in India
Sonalde Desai and Reeve Vanneman study the "Determinants of Maternal and Child Health in India"
Located in Research / Selected Research
Intergenerational Parenting and Health
MPRC Associate Terrence Thornberry is studying Intergenerational Health using the Rochester Youth Development Study
Located in Research / Selected Research
How Does Parental Stress Affect Child Outcomes?
Natasha Cabrera has completed a paper on “Parenting and early predictors of Latino children’s cognitive and social development: Direct and Indirect Effects”
Located in Research / Selected Research
Transitions to Fatherhood
Sandra Hofferth and Frances Goldscheider have just published an article entitled “Family Structure and the Transition to Early Parenthood” in Demography
Located in Research / Selected Research