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Article ReferenceThe effect of framing and placement on linkage consent
Numerous surveys link interview data to administrative records, conditional on respondent consent, in order to explore new and innovative research questions. Optimizing the linkage consent rate is a critical step toward realizing the scientific advantages of record linkage and minimizing the risk of linkage consent bias. Linkage consent rates have been shown to be particularly sensitive to certain design features, such as where the consent question is placed in the questionnaire and how the question is framed. However, the interaction of these design features and their relative contributions to the linkage consent rate have never been jointly studied, raising the practical question of which design feature (or combination of features) should be prioritized from a consent rate perspective. We address this knowledge gap by reporting the results of a placement and framing experiment embedded within separate telephone and Web surveys. We find a significant interaction between placement and framing of the linkage consent question on the consent rate. The effect of placement was larger than the effect of framing in both surveys, and the effect of framing was only evident in the Web survey when the consent question was placed at the end of the questionnaire. Both design features had negligible impact on linkage consent bias for a series of administrative variables available for consenters and non-consenters. We conclude this research note with guidance on the optimal administration of the linkage consent question.
Located in MPRC People / Frauke Kreuter, Ph.D. / Frauke Kreuter Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The Endogeneity of Race: Black Racial Identification and Men’s Earnings in Mexico
A growing body of sociological research has shown that racial identification is not only fluid, but crucially depends on other individual- and societal-level factors. When such factors are also associated with socioeconomic outcomes such as earnings, estimates of the disadvantage experienced by individuals because of how they identify racially obtained from standard regression models may be biased. We illustrate this potential bias using data from a large-scale survey conducted by the Mexican census bureau. This survey is the first by the government agency since the country’s independence to include a question on black identification. We find evidence of a substantial bias in estimates of racial disadvantage. Results from our initial models treating racial self-identification as an exogenous predictor indicate that black men have higher earnings than non-black men. However, when we use an instrumental variables model that treats racial self-identification as endogenous, that is, as a function of the same unobserved characteristics as individuals’ earnings, we find a significant negative effect of black identification on earnings. While previous studies have acknowledged the endogeneity of race, ours is the first to explicitly model racial self-identification as an endogenous predictor to obtain an unbiased estimate of its effect on individuals’ socioeconomic conditions.
Located in Retired Persons / Andrés Villarreal, Ph.D. / Andrés Villarreal Publications
The Healthy Generations Program: Improving Access to Mental Health Care
New model of integrated service delivery makes mental health services more accessible to teenaged parents
Located in Research / Selected Research
The Impact of Family Income in the First Year of Life on Child and Maternal Health: Evidence from the Earned Income Tax Credit
Michel Boudreaux, Health Policy and Management, and Anuj Gangopadhyaya, Urban Institute
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
The Impact of Work Requirements on Program Participation and Labor Supply
Mary Zaki and her colleagues published a working paper analyzing the effects of work requirements on SNAP participation, beneficiary composition, and labor supply
Located in Research / Selected Research
The importance of parental engagement in learning activities for socioemotional development in low-income Black and Latinx youth
New publication by Natasha Cabrera and Jay Fagan uses latent growth curve modeling to investigate trajectories of mothers' and fathers' engagement
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article ReferenceThe Insights and Illusions of Consumption Measurements
While household well-being derives from long-term average rates of consumption, welfare comparisons typically rely on shorter-duration survey measurements. We develop a new strategy to identify the distribution of these long-term rates by leveraging a large-scale randomization in Iraq that elicited repeated short-duration measurements from diaries and recall questions. Identification stems from diary-recall differences in reports from the same household, does not require reports to be error-free, and hinges on a research design with broad replicability. Our strategy delivers practical and costeffective suggestions for designing survey modules to yield the closest measurements of consumption well-being. In addition, we find little empirical support for the claim that acquisition diaries yield the most accurate measurement of poverty and inequality and offer new insights to interpret and reconcile diary-recall differences in household surveys.
Located in MPRC People / Erich Battistin, Ph.D. / Erich Battistin Publications
Article ReferenceThe Intergenerational Stability of Punishment: Paternal Incarceration and Suspension or Expulsion in Elementary School
Objectives: I extend the life-course theory of cumulative disadvantage to focus on continuity in punishment across generations. Specifically, I examine (1) the association between paternal incarceration and elementary school suspension or expulsion and (2) the extent to which behavior problems and weakened social bonds explain this association. Method: Analyses rely on logistic regression, propensity score matching, and mediation methods with data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3,201), a birth cohort of children born in large U.S. cities between 1998 and 2000. Results: The odds of school punishment among children who had a residential father incarcerated by age 5 are 75 percent greater than the odds for children in a matched control group. About one third of this association is accounted for by behavior problems and weakened social bonds. Even after accounting for behavior problems and social bonds, children whose fathers were incarcerated are at greater risk of school punishment. Conclusions: I find evidence of an intergenerational stability of punishment and mixed support for an intergenerational extension to cumulative disadvantage theory. Paternal incarceration is associated with children’s likelihood of experiencing formal punishment in elementary school, and behavior problems and weakened social bonds explain part of this association
Located in MPRC People / Wade C Jacobsen, Ph.D. / Wade Jacobsen Publications
The New York Times quotes Rashawn Ray on this week's unrest in Baltimore
The real root cause of the riots: Hopelessness
Located in News
The Nuances of Blackness: Race, Complexion and Mental Health
Verna M. Keith, Professor, Department of Sociology, Texas A & M University
Located in Coming Up