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Cancelled: School of Public Policy - Forum with Michael Rendall
CISSM Global Forum - A Simulation Model of Partnership Formation and Fertility for Comparative International Research
Located in Coming Up
FileEpidemiological Paradox or Immigrant Vulnerability ? Obesity Among Young Children of Immigrants
Michael S. Rendall, University of Maryland; Elizabeth H. Baker and Margaret M. Weden, RAND Corporation; 2012-010
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Epidemiological Paradox or Immigrant Vulnerability? Obesity Among Young Children of Immigrants
Michael S. Rendall, University of Maryland; Elizabeth Baker, University of Alabama; Margaret M. Weden, RAND Corporation; 2013-023
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Article ReferenceFirst Birth before First Stable Employment and Subsequent Single-Mother “Disconnection” before and after the Welfare Reform and Great Recession
The authors analyze data from two nationally-representative U.S. surveys that include cohorts of young women before and after the 1996 Welfare Reform. Women were more likely to have their first birth precede their first stable employment after than before the reform. Women with this life-course sequence were at higher risk of single motherhood and, as single mothers, were at higher risk of “disconnection” simultaneously from earned income and public cash benefits. Declines in employment in the Great Recession period resulted in disconnection for between one fifth and one fourth of single mothers who did not experience stable employment before their first birth.
Located in MPRC People / Michael S. Rendall, Ph.D. / Michael S. Rendall Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Intentionally or Ambivalently Risking a Short Interpregnancy Interval: Reproductive-Readiness Factors in Women’s Postpartum Non-Use of Contraception
A focus of research on short interpregnancy intervals (IPI) has been on young disadvantaged women whose births are likely to be unintended. Later initiation of family formation in the United States and other high-income countries points to the need to also consider a woman’s attributes indicative of readiness for purposefully accelerated family formation achieved through short IPIs. We test for whether factors indicating “reproductive readiness”—including being married, being older, and having just had a first birth or a birth later than desired—predict a woman’s non-use of contraception in the postpartum months. We also test for whether this contraceptive non-use results explicitly from wanting to become pregnant again. The data come from the 2012–2015 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, representing women who recently gave birth in any of 35 U.S. states and New York City ( N  = 120,111). We find that these reproductive-readiness factors are highly predictive of women’s postpartum non-use of contraception because of a stated desire to become pregnant and are moderately predictive of contraceptive non-use without an explicit pregnancy intention. We conclude that planning for, or ambivalently risking, a short IPI is a frequent family-formation strategy for women whose family formation has been delayed. This is likely to become increasingly common as family formation in the United States is initiated later in the reproductive life course.
Located in MPRC People / Michael S. Rendall, Ph.D. / Michael S. Rendall Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Intentionally or Ambivalently Risking a Short Interpregnancy Interval: Reproductive-Readiness Factors in Women’s Postpartum Non-Use of Contraception
A focus of research on short interpregnancy intervals (IPI) has been on young disadvantaged women whose births are likely to be unintended. Later initiation of family formation in the United States and other high-income countries points to the need to also consider a woman’s attributes indicative of readiness for purposefully accelerated family formation achieved through short IPIs. We test for whether factors indicating “reproductive readiness”—including being married, being older, and having just had a first birth or a birth later than desired—predict a woman’s non-use of contraception in the postpartum months. We also test for whether this contraceptive non-use results explicitly from wanting to become pregnant again. The data come from the 2012–2015 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, representing women who recently gave birth in any of 35 U.S. states and New York City ( N  = 120,111). We find that these reproductive-readiness factors are highly predictive of women’s postpartum non-use of contraception because of a stated desire to become pregnant and are moderately predictive of contraceptive non-use without an explicit pregnancy intention. We conclude that planning for, or ambivalently risking, a short IPI is a frequent family-formation strategy for women whose family formation has been delayed. This is likely to become increasingly common as family formation in the United States is initiated later in the reproductive life course.
Located in MPRC People / Monica Caudillo, Ph.D. / Monica Caudillo Publications
FileInterracial and Inter-ethnic Marriage and Cohabitation and Self-Rated Health
Lucia C. Lykke, U.S. Census Bureau; Michael S. Rendall, University of Maryland; 2017-009
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
MPRC Leadership Team
The Maryland Population Research Center draws together leading scholars from diverse disciplines to support, produce and promote population-related research of the highest scientific merit.
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Multiple imputation for demographic hazard models with left-censored predictor variables
Michael S. Rendall, University of Maryland; Angela Greulich, Université Paris 1; 2014-011
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Racial Disparities in Residential Mobility and Long-term Population Displacement from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina
Michael S. Rendall, University of Maryland; Narayan Sastri, RAND Corp., and Lori Reeder, University of Maryland; 2017-001
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents