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Dylan Conger, George Washington University
The Effect of Advanced Placement Science on Students' Skills, Confidence, and Stress
Located in Coming Up
Dylan Roby comments on California’s new contract worker law
Companies challenge the new contract worker law by cutting down their working hours
Located in News
Economics Seminar Series: Owen Thomson, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
The Long-Term Health Impacts of Medicaid and CHIP
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Effect of Change in Cumulative Psychosocial Stressors on Change in Body Mass Index Over Time
Introduction:  Increased psychosocial stress and obesity are both associated with elevated risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the effect of change in cumulative psychosocial stressors (stressors) on change in body mass index (BMI) over time is unknown, particularly among older women, a population in whom weight change characterization is complex. Methods and Results:  We examined change in stressors in relation to change in BMI among 20,750 women without CVD or cancer at baseline (2012-13) participating in the Women’s Health Study (WHS) follow-up cohort. Stressors and BMI were collected at two time points 2012-13 (Baseline: T1; mean age=71.8 ± 5.8 years) and 2014-15 (Follow-up: T2; mean age=73.8 ± 5.8 years). Our measures of stressors were comprised of a composite of 8 domains, including acute (e.g. negative life events) and chronic (e.g., financial) stressors. We defined stressors over 3 years of follow-up into four categories: chronically low, delayed, acutely high, and chronically high; and BMI change was grouped into three categories (BMI: loss >3%, gain >3%, and maintenance ± 3%). Women with chronically high stress and delayed stress were younger, current smokers and reported more anxiety/depressive symptoms compared to other women. Women with chronically high stress were more likely to have diabetes, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia than their counterparts. Compared to women who maintained both their BMI and had low stress over time, women with delayed stress or chronically high stress had higher odds of decreased BMI [Delayed: Odds Ratio (OR)  1.16,  95% Confidence Interval (CI):  1.03-1.30 ; Chronically High:  OR=1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.24 ] ( Table 1 ). Conclusion:  Chronically high and delayed cumulative stress were associated with higher odds of weight loss in older women over 3 years. Future studies are needed to test associations between stressors and metabolic, hormonal and autonomic factors resulting in adiposity or musculoskeletal changes.
Located in Retired Persons / Natalie Slopen, Sc.D. / Natalie Slopen Publications
Effects of Depression on Contraceptive Behavior
Julia Steinberg will use an NICHD K01 grant to investigate the impact of depression throughout the reproductive cycle
Located in Research / Selected Research
Elementary School Desegregation and Mid-Life Cognitive Function
Walsemann research identifies integrated early childhood education as factor for improved cognitive function for Black individuals
Located in Research / Selected Research
Elizabeth Frankenberg, University of North Carolina
Long-term Dynamics of Health, Well-Being, and Population Change after a Disaster
Located in Coming Up
Elizabeth Wrigley-Field, University of Minnesota
Racial Disparities in the 1918 Flu Pandemic in US Cities: What We Know and Why it Matters Today
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Environmental Justice and the Food Environment in Prince George’s County, Maryland: Assessment of Three Communities
Lack of access to a health-promoting food environment can lead to poor health outcomes including obesity which is a problem for African-Americans in Prince George’s County, Maryland. Previous research examined the quality of the food environment at the regional level but did not consider local level indicators. In this study, we utilized an environmental justice framework to examine the local food environment in the County. We collected data from 127 food outlets, (convenience stores, grocery stores, and supermarkets), in three racially and socioeconomically diverse communities – Bladensburg (predominantly African American/ Black, with the lowest median household income); Greenbelt (similar percentage of non-white persons as Hyattsville, with the highest median household income); and Hyattsville (dominated by a Hispanic population). We examined the availability, quality, and accessibility of food within each community, using a modified version of the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) healthy food availability index (HFAI).We also used ArcMap 10.6 to examine the spatial distribution of stores in relation to sociodemographic factors and generate descriptive statistics to examine HFAI score differences across the communities, sociodemographic composition, and store types at the block group level. Mean HFAI scores were 7.76, 10.75, and 9.60 for Bladensburg, Greenbelt, and Hyattsville, respectively suggesting a relative disparity in access to diverse healthy and good quality food sources for these communities although these differences were not statistically significant (p=0.79). Statistically significant differences between the communities were found with respect to ethnic stores, stores that sold fresh vegetables (p=0.047), and stores that sold fresh fruits (p=0.012). Getis-Ord Gi Hot Spot Analysis revealed one statistically significant cold spot at 95% confidence, and two others at 90% confidence in Hyattsville, indicating a cluster of low-scoring stores. The results indicate a potential need for expanded food infrastructure in these communities to improve public health. We also identified the need for culturally appropriate foods and proposed ethnic stores as potential salutogens to improve the food environment in culturally diverse neighborhoods.
Located in MPRC People / Sacoby Wilson, Ph.D., M.S. / Sacoby Wilson Publications
Environmental Systems and Occupational Health Policy Analyses to Interrupt the Impact of Structural Racism
Payne-Sturges leads multi-disciplinary research team
Located in Research / Selected Research