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Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Sexual and Gender Minority Youth Alcohol Use: Within-Group Differences in Associations with Internalized Stigma and Victimization
Sexual and gender minority (SGM) youth are more likely to use alcohol than their heterosexual cisgender peers. At the same time, SGM youth experience sexuality- and gender identity-specific stressors known to exacerbate negative health outcomes. Though scholars have established a link between minority stressors (e.g., internalized stigma and victimization) and increased alcohol use for SGM youth as a whole, there is little indication of whether internalized stigma and victimization are more strongly associated with alcohol use for specific groups of SGM youth. A United States sample of 11,811 racially and geographically diverse 13–17 year old SGM youth was used to employ a series of gender-stratified multivariable regression models to examine the association among internalized stigma, victimization, and alcohol-related behaviors, and whether they differed for specific groups of sexual minority youth. Sexual orientation moderated several associations between sexual minority stressors (i.e., victimization and stigma) and youth’s alcohol use (i.e., recent use and heavy episodic drinking) across models stratified by gender (i.e., male, female, and non-binary). For example, bisexual boys had stronger associations between SGM-specific victimization and alcohol use frequency and heavy episodic drinking relative to gay boys; conversely, victimization and alcohol use frequency were more weakly associated among bisexual girls relative to lesbian/gay girls. Pansexual girls showed weaker associations between internalized stigma and alcohol use frequency compared to lesbian/gay girls. This paper demonstrates who among SGM youth are more likely to engage in alcohol-related behaviors as a function of differential forms of SGM-related victimization and stigma. These findings can inform substance use interventions that are tailored to youth of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities.
Located in MPRC People / Jessica N Fish, Ph.D. / Jessica N Fish Publications
Article ReferenceImplications of Unstable Trends in Marriage, Birth, and Divorce
Using birth, marriage, and divorce data from the U.S. Census, this study examines the stability in trends between 1920 and 2008. Our investigation substantiates the reactive nature of family trends to any intervention or change in its environment. We find that changes in family trends, which might have been initiated by changes in policies or other interventions, are permanent and do not fade away by reversing policies or interventions. Hence, family and consumer scientists, policymakers, and practitioners must explicitly allow for unstable trends when researching or targeting the dynamics of birth, marriage, and divorce, and prescribing interventions that they view as stabilizers of family dynamics.
Located in MPRC People / Manouchehr (Mitch) Mokhtari, Ph.D. / Mitch Mokhtari Publications
Philip Cohen comments on declining divorce rate in Michigan in Lansing State Journal
Dropping divorce rate among women age under 45 in Michigan may indicate later but stabler marriage
Located in News
Advanced School Progression Relative to Age and Early Family Formation in Mexico
Mónica Caudillo Demography article re-examines education outcomes in light of advanced school progression by age
Located in Research / Selected Research
Melissa Kearney featured in The New York Times on Early Childhood Intervention
Children exposed to "Sesame Street" were more likely to be enrolled in the correct grade level for their age at middle and high school
Located in News
Kearney examines COVID baby bust
Diminished births have long-term consequences
Located in News
CANCELLED: Cynthia Feliciano, Washington University in St. Louis
Contextual Inequalities and Socioeconomic Outcomes among Adult Children of U.S. Immigrants
Located in Coming Up
Maria Charles, University of California, Santa Barbara
Complicating Patriarchy: Gender Beliefs of Muslim Facebook Users in the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia
Located in Coming Up
Sayer research featured in The Atlantic
Varies by person's role
Located in News
Christina Cross, Harvard University
Racialized Returns: Examining Racial Differences in the Consequences of Living in a Two-Parent Family
Located in Coming Up