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Kearney edits Future of Children volume
How Cultural Factors Shape Economic Outcomes
Located in News
Kearney examines COVID baby bust
Diminished births have long-term consequences
Located in News
Kearney featured on PBS Newshour
Biden support for families encouraged
Located in News
Kearney helps clarify single-mother challenges
Single-parent homes lose more than just a second income
Located in News
Keera Allendorf, Indiana University Bloomington
Parents’ Valuation of Approving a Child’s Spouse in a Context of Marital Change
Located in Coming Up
Kei Nomaguchi, Department of Sociology, Bowling Green State University
Changes in Mothers' Perceptions of Neighborhood Quality, Child Well-Being, and Parenting Stress, 1976-2002
Located in Coming Up
Kevin Roy Comments on Stay-at-home Dads on Baltimore Magazine
Stay-at-home dads are more gender equitable, holding positive thoughts about themselves and their wives
Located in News
Kinship, Nuptiality and Child Health Outcomes in a Low Income Urban Area - JAMAA na AFYA ya MTOTO (JAMO)
Sangeetha Madhavan PI, with Kristen Stoebenau, Kenneth Leonard and Michael Wagner
Located in Research / Selected Research
Kirsten Stoebenau, Behavioral & Community Health
"Come, we try" - A qualitative study of changing marital practices in low-income settings in Eastern Africa and the implications for maternal and child health
Located in Coming Up
Article ReferenceLatent Classes of Polysubstance Use Among Adolescents in the United States: Intersections of Sexual Identity with Sex, Age, and Race/Ethnicity
PURPOSE: We aimed to estimate latent classes of concurrent polysubstance use and test for sexual orientation differences in latent class memberships with representative data from adolescents living in 19 U.S. states. We also tested whether sex, race/ethnicity, and age moderated the sexual identity differences in polysubstance use class memberships. METHODS: We analyzed data from 119,437 adolescents from 19 states who participated in the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Latent class analysis characterized polysubstance use patterns based on self-reported frequency of lifetime and past-month use of alcohol (including heavy episodic drinking), tobacco (cigarettes, cigars, and smokeless tobacco), and marijuana. Multinomial logistic regression models tested differences in latent class memberships by sexual identity. Interaction terms tested whether sex, race/ethnicity, and age moderated the sexual identity differences in polysubstance use class memberships. RESULTS: A six-class model of polysubstance use fit the data best and included nonusers (61.5%), experimental users (12.2%), marijuana-alcohol users (14.8%), tobacco-alcohol users (3.8%), medium-frequency three-substance users (3.6%), and high-frequency three-substance users (4.1%). Gay/lesbian- and bisexual-identified adolescents had significantly higher odds than heterosexual-identified adolescents of being in all of the user classes compared with the nonuser class. These sexual identity differences in latent polysubstance use class memberships were generally larger for females than for males, varied occasionally by race/ethnicity, and were sometimes larger for younger ages. CONCLUSION: Compared with their heterosexual peers, gay/lesbian and bisexual adolescents-especially females-are at heightened risk of engaging in multiple types of polysubstance use. Designing, implementing, and evaluating interventions will likely reduce these sexual orientation disparities.
Located in MPRC People / Jessica N Fish, Ph.D. / Jessica N Fish Publications