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Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Individual- and Family-Level Correlates of Socio-Emotional Functioning among African American Youth from Single-Mother Homes: A Compensatory Resilience Model
The majority of research on African American adolescents raised in single-mother homes has focused on externalizing problems, with less attention to other facets of socio-emotional functioning. Using a compensatory resilience approach, the current study examined risk and protective factors at the family (maternal warmth, monitoring, psychological control) and youth (ethnic identity and religiosity) levels as predictors of depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and self-esteem among African American adolescents from single-mother homes ( n  = 193). Lower levels of psychological control, higher levels of monitoring, and higher levels of youth ethnic identity were associated with at least one of the outcomes, depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and self-esteem. In addition, self-esteem, but not hopelessness, mediated the associations between the family- and youth-level factors and youth depressive symptoms. The importance of targeting maternal psychological control and youth ethnic identity, as well as self-esteem, in intervention programs for African American youth from single-mother families is discussed.
Located in MPRC People / Cecily Hardaway, Ph.D. / Cecily Hardaway Publications
Institutional Change and the Consequences of Military Service
In a Collaborative Research project funded by the National Science Foundation, Meredith Kleykamp looks at outcomes in marriage, education, employment and earnings among veterans and non-veterans over the last 40 years.
Located in Research / Selected Research
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Intentionally or Ambivalently Risking a Short Inter-pregnancy Interval: Reproductive Readiness Factors in Women’s Postpartum Non-Use of Contraception
Michael S. Rendall, Eowna Young Harrison, Mónica Caudillo, University of Maryland; 2018-003
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Intergenerational Parenting and Health
MPRC Associate Terrence Thornberry is studying Intergenerational Health using the Rochester Youth Development Study
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Intimate Partner Violence and Effectiveness Level of Contraceptive Selection Post-Abortion
Materials and Methods:  Using data on 245 women who were attending an urban hospital abortion clinic, we assessed whether women had ever experienced emotional, physical, or sexual IPV. Effectiveness of women's post-abortion contraceptive method selection was categorized into high (intrauterine device [IUD] and implant), moderate (pill, patch, ring, and shot), and low (condoms, emergency contraception, and none) effectiveness. Using multinomial logistic regression, we examined the relationship between number of types of IPV experienced and post-abortion contraceptive method effectiveness, adjusting for sociodemographics, prior abortion, having children, abortion trimester, importance of avoiding pregnancy in the next year, pre-abortion psychological distress, and effectiveness level of the contraceptive method women were planning to use before contraceptive counseling. Results:  Twenty-seven percent (27%) of women experienced two or three types of IPV, 35% experienced one IPV type, and 38% experienced no IPV. Compared to women with no histories of IPV, women who experienced two or more types of IPV during their lifetimes were more likely to choose contraceptive methods with moderate effectiveness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 5.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13–24.23, p = 0.035) and high effectiveness (AOR = 5.01, 95% CI: 1.12–22.39, p = 0.035) than those with low effectiveness. Conclusion:  Women who experienced two or more types of lifetime IPV selected more effective contraceptive methods post-abortion. Access to contraceptives that are not partner dependent, including long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), may be particularly important for women who have experienced multiple types of IPV.
Located in MPRC People / Mona Mittal, Ph.D. / Mona Mittal Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Intimate Partner Violence and Effectiveness Level of Contraceptive Selection Post-Abortion
Materials and Methods:  Using data on 245 women who were attending an urban hospital abortion clinic, we assessed whether women had ever experienced emotional, physical, or sexual IPV. Effectiveness of women's post-abortion contraceptive method selection was categorized into high (intrauterine device [IUD] and implant), moderate (pill, patch, ring, and shot), and low (condoms, emergency contraception, and none) effectiveness. Using multinomial logistic regression, we examined the relationship between number of types of IPV experienced and post-abortion contraceptive method effectiveness, adjusting for sociodemographics, prior abortion, having children, abortion trimester, importance of avoiding pregnancy in the next year, pre-abortion psychological distress, and effectiveness level of the contraceptive method women were planning to use before contraceptive counseling. Results:  Twenty-seven percent (27%) of women experienced two or three types of IPV, 35% experienced one IPV type, and 38% experienced no IPV. Compared to women with no histories of IPV, women who experienced two or more types of IPV during their lifetimes were more likely to choose contraceptive methods with moderate effectiveness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 5.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13–24.23, p = 0.035) and high effectiveness (AOR = 5.01, 95% CI: 1.12–22.39, p = 0.035) than those with low effectiveness. Conclusion:  Women who experienced two or more types of lifetime IPV selected more effective contraceptive methods post-abortion. Access to contraceptives that are not partner dependent, including long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), may be particularly important for women who have experienced multiple types of IPV.
Located in MPRC People / Julia Steinberg, Ph.D. / Julia Steinberg Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Intimate Partner Violence and Effectiveness Level of Contraceptive Selection Post-Abortion
Materials and Methods:  Using data on 245 women who were attending an urban hospital abortion clinic, we assessed whether women had ever experienced emotional, physical, or sexual IPV. Effectiveness of women's post-abortion contraceptive method selection was categorized into high (intrauterine device [IUD] and implant), moderate (pill, patch, ring, and shot), and low (condoms, emergency contraception, and none) effectiveness. Using multinomial logistic regression, we examined the relationship between number of types of IPV experienced and post-abortion contraceptive method effectiveness, adjusting for sociodemographics, prior abortion, having children, abortion trimester, importance of avoiding pregnancy in the next year, pre-abortion psychological distress, and effectiveness level of the contraceptive method women were planning to use before contraceptive counseling. Results:  Twenty-seven percent (27%) of women experienced two or three types of IPV, 35% experienced one IPV type, and 38% experienced no IPV. Compared to women with no histories of IPV, women who experienced two or more types of IPV during their lifetimes were more likely to choose contraceptive methods with moderate effectiveness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 5.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13–24.23, p = 0.035) and high effectiveness (AOR = 5.01, 95% CI: 1.12–22.39, p = 0.035) than those with low effectiveness. Conclusion:  Women who experienced two or more types of lifetime IPV selected more effective contraceptive methods post-abortion. Access to contraceptives that are not partner dependent, including long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), may be particularly important for women who have experienced multiple types of IPV.
Located in MPRC People / Marie Thoma, Ph.D. / Marie Thoma Publications
IPUMS - Time Use website launched
Hofferth and colleagues help make time use data readily accessible
Located in Research / Selected Research
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Is banning sex-selection the best approach for reducing prenatal discrimination ?
Monica Das Gupta, University of Maryland // Keywords: Son preference, abortion bans, gender, policy measures, China, India; 2017-003
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Jamie Trevitt, University of Maryland Baltimore County
Post-abortion Contraception Preference
Located in Coming Up