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Special Symposium: The New Media Generation: Implications of Computer and Video Game Use for Parents and Teachers
Allison Druin, Director and Associate Professor, Human Computer Interaction Laboratory, College of Information Studies; Sandra Hofferth, Director, Maryland Population Research Center, Professor of Family Science, School of Public Health; Melanie Killen, Professor, Human Development, College of Education, Affiliate Professor, Department of Psychology
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Data on the Undercount of Young Children in the U.S. Decennial Census
William O'Hare, Research Fellow, National Science Foundation / American Statistical Association / Census Bureau
Located in Coming Up
Seminar: Continuity and Change in Children's Time Use Trajectories
Liana C. Sayer, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Maryland
Located in Coming Up
Kei Nomaguchi, Department of Sociology, Bowling Green State University
Changes in Mothers' Perceptions of Neighborhood Quality, Child Well-Being, and Parenting Stress, 1976-2002
Located in Coming Up
Linda Quirke, Department of Sociology, Wilfrid Laurier University
The Four O'Clock Shuffle: Parental Management of Children's Time Scarcity
Located in Coming Up
Melissa Kearney featured in The New York Times on Early Childhood Intervention
Children exposed to "Sesame Street" were more likely to be enrolled in the correct grade level for their age at middle and high school
Located in News
Melissa Kearney outlines child poverty response
Plan could virtually end child poverty
Located in News
Article ReferenceBehavioral and Emotional Development of African American Boys Growing Up in Risky Environments
Black males experience extraordinary developmental risks as a consequence of the combined effects of male gender, poverty, and race. These risks are reflected in atypical behavioral and emotional development often observed in middle childhood. Not all Black males succumb to these risks. Whether or not they do is a function of exposure to adverse childhood events resulting from poverty, the experience of racial bias, and access to mitigating cultural resources and familial supports. Reducing household poverty and increasing access to early childhood programs, school‐based programs, and mentoring are promising interventions to increase the probability of positive outcomes.
Located in MPRC People / Oscar Barbarin, Ph.D. / Oscar Barbarin Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Individual- and Family-Level Correlates of Socio-Emotional Functioning among African American Youth from Single-Mother Homes: A Compensatory Resilience Model
The majority of research on African American adolescents raised in single-mother homes has focused on externalizing problems, with less attention to other facets of socio-emotional functioning. Using a compensatory resilience approach, the current study examined risk and protective factors at the family (maternal warmth, monitoring, psychological control) and youth (ethnic identity and religiosity) levels as predictors of depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and self-esteem among African American adolescents from single-mother homes ( n  = 193). Lower levels of psychological control, higher levels of monitoring, and higher levels of youth ethnic identity were associated with at least one of the outcomes, depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and self-esteem. In addition, self-esteem, but not hopelessness, mediated the associations between the family- and youth-level factors and youth depressive symptoms. The importance of targeting maternal psychological control and youth ethnic identity, as well as self-esteem, in intervention programs for African American youth from single-mother families is discussed.
Located in MPRC People / Cecily Hardaway, Ph.D. / Cecily Hardaway Publications