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Marian Moser Jones featured in The Conversation on State Emergency facing COVID-19
Following Donald Trump’s declaration of a federal state of emergency, every state had also declared a state of emergency over COVID-19.
Located in News
Marian Moser Jones featured in FiveThirtyEight on how COVID-19 can affect political campaigns in U.S.
Presidential campaign may be severely affected with the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the public life in different ways, but history shows U.S. can manage the election during rough times
Located in News
Time Use Data for Population, Health and Policy Research
Liana Sayer and Sandra Hofferth Lead Workshop
Located in Coming Up
Health Policy Fellowships
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - November 9, 2020
Located in Resources / / Announcements / Announcement items
For Young Women in Sub-Saharan Africa Addressing Transactional Sex May be Key to Reducing HIV Infections
Transactional Sex and HIV Risk: From Analysis to Action
Located in Research / Selected Research
Tobacco Control Policies to Promote Health Equity
National Cancer Institute - November 12, 2020
Located in Resources / / Announcements / Announcement items
Philip Cohen cited in health policy and public response for COVID
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Connections and Divergence between Public Health and Built Environment—A Scoping Review
Abstract: Public health and built environment design have a long-intertwined history of promoting a healthy quality of life. They emerged with the common goal of preventing infectious disease outbreaks in urban areas and improving occupants’ living conditions. In recent years, however, the two disciplines have become less engaged and with each developing a distinct focus. To respond to this disconnection, a systematic review was conducted to identify the connection and divergence between public health and built environment design and planning. This paper aims to establish a context for understanding the connections, synergies, and divergence between public health and built environment design disciplines. Further, the four main health factors in the built environment are identified and explained: physical, physiological, biological, and psychological factors. Finally, future trends to reconnect public health with build environment design are then outlined.
Located in MPRC People / Jennifer D. Roberts, Dr.P.H., M.P.H. / Jennifer D. Roberts Publications