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Cancelled: School of Public Policy - Forum with Michael Rendall
CISSM Global Forum - A Simulation Model of Partnership Formation and Fertility for Comparative International Research
Located in Coming Up
Time Use Data Access System
Sandra Hofferth continues Time Use project to extend data "backwards through time and geographically across countries"
Located in Research / Selected Research
Developing Nations: "Our Pollution is Your Consumption"
MPRC Faculty Associate Klaus Hubacek demonstrates how material consumption in rich countries is fueled by pollution and environmental destruction in the developing world
Located in Research / Selected Research
Mexico-US Migration during the Great Recession
Andrés Villarreal investigates the causal origins of the recent decline in migration from Mexico to the United States
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article ReferenceInternational organizations and the political economy of reforms
We develop a simple dynamic model of policy reform that captures some of the determinants that underlie the differences between the reform paths taken by a number of countries since the early 1990s. The model focuses on the interaction between domestic institutions and international organizations that promote reform, on the one hand, and the political incentives for reversing reforms, on the other. At equilibrium, there are three types of reform paths. A country can undergo a full-scale, lasting reform, can carry out a partial but lasting reform, or can go through cycles of reforms and costly counter-reforms. Domestic institutions, along with the incentives provided by international organizations, determine the equilibrium path. A politically myopic international organization may induce cycles of reforms and costly counter-reforms, thereby reducing the country's well-being. An international organization that only provides funds to promote reforms may have a less beneficial effect than one that assists the country with fresh funds to defend reforms when there is a risk of reversal. International funds that promote reforms can also influence domestic institutions. For example, due to the intervention of an international organization, countries could have incentives to dismantle institutions that build up reversal cost and/or do not fully build their fiscal capacity.
Located in MPRC People / Sebastian Galiani, Ph.D. / Sebastian Galiani Publications
Hubacek, Feng, and Yu Explore the Impact of Globalization and Trade on the Environment
The consequences of affluence: Consumption of large amounts of material goods places an unfair environmental burden on less developed areas
Located in News
IUSSP: Abstract Deadline
IUSSP International Population Conference will be held 26-31 Aug 2013
Located in Coming Up