Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

You are here: Home

Search results

12 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type









































New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Journal Club Meeting with Natalie Slopen
Maternal experiences of ethnic discrimination and child cardiometabolic outcomes in the Study of Latino (SOL) Youth
Located in Coming Up
Local Food Prices, SNAP Purchasing Power, and Child Health
AREC Seminar Series
Located in Coming Up
Audrey Dorelien, University of Minnesota
The Effects of In Utero Exposure to Influenza on Birth and Infant Outcomes in the US
Located in Coming Up
Kirsten Stoebenau, Behavioral & Community Health
"Come, we try" - A qualitative study of changing marital practices in low-income settings in Eastern Africa and the implications for maternal and child health
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Quantiles of the Gain Distribution of an Early Childhood Intervention
We offer a new strategy to identify the distribution of treatment effects using data from the Infant Health and Development Program (IHDP), a relatively understudied early-childhood intervention for low birth-weight infants. We introduce a new policy parameter, QCD, which denotes quantiles of the effect distribution conditional on latent neonatal health. The dependence between potential outcomes originates from a new class of factor models where latent health can affect the location and shape of distributions. We first show that QCD depends on quantiles of marginal outcome distributions given latent health. We then achieve identification of these marginal distributions and QCD by proxying latent health with neonatal anthropometrics and accounting for measurement error in these proxies. The effects of enrolling in IHDP are widely distributed across children and depend on neonatal health. Moreover, the large average effects documented in past work for close to normal birth weight children from low-income families are driven by a minority of children in this group.
Located in MPRC People / Erich Battistin, Ph.D. / Erich Battistin Publications
Using New Policy Parameter to Study Early Childhood Intervention for Low Birth-weight Infants
Erich Battistin examines a relatively understudied early-childhood intervention for low birth-weight infants using new policy parameter
Located in Research / Selected Research
MacDorman co-authors midwifery outcomes research
Midwifery linked to better birth outcomes in state-by-state "report card"
Located in Research / Selected Research
Midwifery could be key to addressing maternal health inequities
ProPublica story reports implications of MacDorman study
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Maternal experiences of ethnic discrimination and child cardiometabolic outcomes in the Study of Latino (SOL) Youth
Purpose Limited research has examined maternal experiences of racial/ethnic discrimination in relation to child cardiometabolic health. In this study, we investigated whether maternal experiences of ethnic discrimination were associated with cardiometabolic risk in Hispanic/Latino youth several years later. Methods Our sample included 1146 youth (8–16 years) from the Study of Latino Youth (2012–2014), who were children of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos participants (2008–2011). We used regression models to examine the prospective associations between maternal report of ethnic discrimination in relation to her child's  body mass index  (BMI) z-score,  metabolic syndrome  score (MetS), and high sensitivity  C-reactive protein  (hsCRP) levels 2 years later. Results Maternal ethnic discrimination was associated with youth hsCRP, but not BMI or MetS (P -values >.05). Adjusting for age, nativity, and national background, maternal ethnic discrimination was associated with higher (log) hsCRP levels (β = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.04 to 0.32) in children. This association was robust to adjustment for maternal and household characteristics (β = 0.17, 95% CI = 0.04 to 0.31), as well as  maternal depression  and maternal BMI. Conclusions Maternal ethnic discrimination is associated with inflammation among Hispanic/Latino youth, and not BMI z-score or MetS. Studies are needed to address temporality and pathways.
Located in MPRC People / Natalie Slopen, Sc.D. / Natalie Slopen Publications
How combined exposure to environmental and social stressors affects child neurological development
Focus on solutions for long-term policy
Located in Research / Selected Research