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How Does Parental Stress Affect Child Outcomes?
Natasha Cabrera has completed a paper on “Parenting and early predictors of Latino children’s cognitive and social development: Direct and Indirect Effects”
Located in Research / Selected Research
Family Processes, Intergenerational Learning and Involved Fathering
MPRC associates are collaborating on a component project that investigates intergenerational mechanisms through which “responsible fathering” may be transmitted.
Located in Research / Selected Research
Low-Income Fathers' Linguistic Influence on their Children's' Language Development
Faculty Associate Natasha Cabrera begins work on the effects of speech on children
Located in Research / Selected Research
Urban low-Income fathers and children’s wellbeing
Natasha Cabrera, Human Development
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Cabrera on Mothers’ and Fathers’ Playfulness
Playfulness is associated with children's emotion regulation and vocabulary skills
Located in Research / Selected Research
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Union Instability and Children’s Behavioral Problems: A Mediation and Moderation Approach
Natasha Cabrera and Elizabeth Karberg, University of Maryland; 2014-012
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Family Structure Change Among Latinos: Variation by Ecologic Risk
We examined differences in family structure change in an urban sample of mothers (N = 1,314) from their child’s birth to age 5 and whether ecological risk moderated this association. We found that compared with U.S.-born Latino mothers, foreign-born Latino mothers were 62% less likely to break up and 75% less likely to repartner than remain stably resident. Across nativity status, Latina mothers with fewer children, more economic stress, less income, and less frequently reported father involvement were more likely to break up and repartner than remain stably resident. We found no moderation effects of ecological risk.
Located in MPRC People / Natasha Cabrera, Ph.D. / Natasha Cabrera Publications
Early Home Experiences of Young Latino Boys
Why research on low-income Latino children really matters
Located in Research / Selected Research
Natasha Cabrera, Human Development
The long-reach of fathers' earnings on children's skills in two-parent families
Located in Coming Up
Cabrera's work featured on MedicalXpress.com
Family cohesion, discipline, and strong ethnic identity help low-income kids succeed
Located in News