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Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Seizing opportunities for intervention: Changing HIV-related knowledge among men who have sex with men and transgender women attending trusted community centers in Nigeria
Background Knowledge of HIV risk factors and reduction strategies is essential for prevention in key populations such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW). We evaluated factors associated with HIV-related knowledge among MSM and TGW and the impact of engagement in care at trusted community health centers in Nigeria. Methods The TRUST/RV368 cohort recruited MSM and TGW in Lagos and Abuja, Nigeria via respondent driven sampling. During study visits every three months, participants underwent structured interviews to collect behavioral data, received HIV education, and were provided free condoms and condom compatible lubricants. Five HIV-related knowledge questions were asked at enrollment and repeated after 9 and 15 months. The mean number of correct responses was calculated for each visit with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multivariable Poisson regression was used to calculate adjusted risk ratios and CIs for factors associated with answering more knowledge questions correctly. Results From March 2013 to April 2018, 2122 persons assigned male sex at birth were enrolled, including 234 TGW (11.2%). The mean number of correct responses at enrollment was 2.36 (95% CI: 2.31–2.41) and increased to 2.95 (95% CI: 2.86–3.04) and 3.06 (95% CI: 2.97–3.16) after 9 and 15 months in the study, respectively. Among 534 participants who completed all three HIV-related knowledge assessments, mean number of correct responses rose from 2.70 (95% CI: 2.60–2.80) to 3.02 (95% CI: 2.93–3.13) and then 3.06 (95% CI: 2.96–3.16). Factors associated with increased overall HIV-related knowledge included longer duration of study participation, HIV seropositivity, higher education level, and more frequent internet use. Conclusions There was suboptimal HIV-related knowledge among Nigerian MSM and TGW at that improved modestly with engagement in care. These data demonstrate unmet HIV education needs among Nigerian MSM and TGW and provide insights into modalities that could be used to address these needs.
Located in MPRC People / Hongjie Liu, Ph.D. / Hongjie Liu Publications
Analyzing the effects of food supplementation and adherence support on food insecurity, time allocation, and quality of life indices of patients on antiretroviral treatment in the Free State Province, South Africa
Alok Bhargava investigates food insecurity, quality of life, and productivity among HIV patients receiving antiretroviral treatment in South Africa
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Kirsten Stoebenau, Behavioral & Community Health
"Come, we try" - A qualitative study of changing marital practices in low-income settings in Eastern Africa and the implications for maternal and child health
Located in Coming Up
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Eliciting and Utilizing Willingness-to-Pay: Evidence from Field Trials in Northern Ghana
Raymond Guiteras, University of Maryland; James Berry, Cornell University; Greg Fischer, London School of Economics // Keywords: price mechanism, heterogeneous treatment effects, health behavior, Becker-DeGroot-Marschak, field experiments; 2015-017
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Mothers, Kin, and Father Involvement in Urban South Africa
Sangeetha Madhavan, University of Maryland, et al. // Keywords: fathers, mothers, kin, South Africa; 2012-014
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
For Young Women in Sub-Saharan Africa Addressing Transactional Sex May be Key to Reducing HIV Infections
Transactional Sex and HIV Risk: From Analysis to Action
Located in Research / Selected Research
Seminar Series: Single Motherhood and Child Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Life Course Perspective
Shelley Clark, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, McGill University
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Micro-Ordeals and Preventative Health Products: Evidence on Short-Term Take-Up and Habit Formation
Vivian Hoffmann, Assistant Professor, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Maryland
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Ethnomedicine and Biomedicine in Rural Senegal: Rationality and Magical Thinking
Jack Sandberg, Associate Professor, Department of Global Health, George Washington University
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Sexual health of adolescent girls and young women in Central Uganda: exploring perceived coercive aspects of transactional sex
Adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) in Uganda are at risk of early sexual debut, unwanted pregnancy, violence, and disproportionally high HIV infection rates, driven in part by transactional sex. This paper examines the extent to which AGYW’s participation in transactional sex is perceived to be coerced. We conducted 19 focus group discussions and 44 in-depth interviews using semi-structured tools. Interviews were audio recorded, and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using a thematic analysis. While AGYW did not necessarily use the language of coercion, their narratives describe a number of coercive aspects in their relationships. First, coercion by force as a result of “de-toothing” a man (whereby they received money or resources but did not wish to provide sex as “obligated” under the implicit “terms” of the relationships). Second, they described the coercive role that receiving resources played in their decision to have sex in the face of men’s verbal insistence. Finally, they discussed having sex as a result of coercive economic circumstances including poverty, and because of peer pressure to uphold modern lifestyles. Support for income-generation activities, microfinance and social protection programmes may help reduce AGYW’s vulnerability to sexual coercion in transactional sex relationships. Targeting gender norms that contribute to unequal power dynamics and social expectations that obligate AGYW to provide sex in return for resources, critically assessing the meaning of consensual sex, and normative interventions building on parents’ efforts to ascertain the source of their daughters’ resources may also reduce AGYW’s vulnerability to coercion.
Located in MPRC People / Kirsten Stoebenau, Ph.D. / Kristen Stoebenau Publications