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Cancelled: School of Public Policy - Forum with Michael Rendall
CISSM Global Forum - A Simulation Model of Partnership Formation and Fertility for Comparative International Research
Located in Coming Up
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Assessing the Impact of Local Violence on Teenage Fertility: The Case of Mexico
Mónica Caudillo, Maryland Population Research Center // Key words: Adolescents, Crime, Violence, Demography, Fertility; 2017-006
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
File Troff document (with manpage macros)"Missing Girls" in the South Caucasus Countries: Trends, Possible Causes, and Policy Options
Monica Das Gupta, University of Maryland // Keywords: Gender, Poverty, Economic Shocks, Social Protection, Governance, Health, Population; JEL codes: D13, H31, H55, J13, J16, P31; 2017-004
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Is banning sex-selection the best approach for reducing prenatal discrimination ?
Monica Das Gupta, University of Maryland // Keywords: Son preference, abortion bans, gender, policy measures, China, India; 2017-003
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Keera Allendorf, Indiana University Bloomington
Parents’ Valuation of Approving a Child’s Spouse in a Context of Marital Change
Located in Coming Up
CANCELED: Connie Gager, Montclair State University
Union Dissolution or Conflict?: The Interactive Effect of Parental Marital Status and Conflict on Adult Children’s Relationship Conflict
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Prevalence and Correlates of Alcohol Consumption During Pregnancy in Georgia: Evidence from a National Survey
Background: While alcohol consumption is pervasive in the country of Georgia, the extent of alcohol consumption among pregnant women is yet to be examined. The goal of this study is to examine prevalence and correlates of alcohol consumption during pregnancy in Georgia. Methods: Using data from the World Health Organization’s Stepwise approach to noncommunicable disease risk factor surveillance in Georgia, this study examined prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of alcohol use among pregnant women in Georgia. The study sample of reproductive age (18-45) women was drawn from the STEPS, which is a large and nationally representative survey of adults with a 95% participation rate. Frequencies, multivariate analyses and related statistics were computed to describe and study associations among the target population and the odds of alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Results: Only 66 individuals in the sample were pregnant. About 13% of pregnant women consumed alcohol in the past 30 days and nearly 70% of them engaged in binge drinking on at least one occasion. Pregnant women who were young, married, homemakers, living in two-member households and in the lowest bracket of monthly income had the highest likelihood of consuming alcohol and binge drinking. The study results were statistically significant (p< .05). Conclusions: This study reveals the magnitude of alcohol consumption and binge drinking among reproductive age women in Georgia. This study also shows prevalence and correlates of alcohol consumption during pregnancy in Georgia. The results identify characteristics of women who are most likely to use alcohol during pregnancy. Given that, alcohol use is a modifiable behavioral risk factor, the findings in this study provide the foundation for evidence-based prevention strategies that target pregnant and reproductive age women.
Located in MPRC People / Manouchehr (Mitch) Mokhtari, Ph.D. / Mitch Mokhtari Publications
Addressing Health Equity Among Central American and African-American Women and Youth
The Consortium on Race, Gender, & Ethnicity, Moderated by Dr. Diana Guelespe.
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The cost of access: Racial disparities in student loan burdens of young adults
Student loans have become a social-financial issue in the United States. This study uses a nationally representative dataset to examine the association between financial socialization and student loan borrowing behavior of individuals after controlling a number of different socio-demographic factors. Results show that the financial burdens of college education, such as borrowing and the dollar amounts of a loan, are higher for Blacks, however, their college attendance is significantly lower than Whites. Blacks are more independent and receive less financial support from family and relatives than Whites. The wealth gap that exists between Black and White parents may contribute to the disparity. Additional financial resources for higher education as well as financial education and counseling may be needed to create better academic access for the vulnerable underserved groups including minority students.
Located in MPRC People / Jinhee Kim, Ph.D. / JinHee Kim Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Love, money, and parental goods: Does parental matchmaking matter?
While parental matchmaking has been widespread throughout history and across countries, we know little about the relationship between parental matchmaking and marriage outcomes. Does parental involvement in matchmaking help ensure their needs are better taken care of by married children? This paper finds supportive evidence using a survey of Chinese couples. In particular, parental involvement in matchmaking is associated with having a more submissive wife, a greater number of children, a higher likelihood of having any male children, and a stronger belief of the husband in providing old age support to his parents. These benefits, however, are achieved at the cost of less marital harmony within the couple and lower market income of the wife. The results render support to and extend the findings of Becker, Murphy and Spenkuch (2015) where parents meddle with children's preferences to ensure their commitment to providing parental goods such as old age support.
Located in MPRC People / Ginger Zhe Jin, Ph.D. / Ginger Zhe Jin Publications