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Addressing Health Equity Among Central American and African-American Women and Youth
The Consortium on Race, Gender, & Ethnicity, Moderated by Dr. Diana Guelespe.
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The cost of access: Racial disparities in student loan burdens of young adults
Student loans have become a social-financial issue in the United States. This study uses a nationally representative dataset to examine the association between financial socialization and student loan borrowing behavior of individuals after controlling a number of different socio-demographic factors. Results show that the financial burdens of college education, such as borrowing and the dollar amounts of a loan, are higher for Blacks, however, their college attendance is significantly lower than Whites. Blacks are more independent and receive less financial support from family and relatives than Whites. The wealth gap that exists between Black and White parents may contribute to the disparity. Additional financial resources for higher education as well as financial education and counseling may be needed to create better academic access for the vulnerable underserved groups including minority students.
Located in MPRC People / Jinhee Kim, Ph.D. / JinHee Kim Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Love, money, and parental goods: Does parental matchmaking matter?
While parental matchmaking has been widespread throughout history and across countries, we know little about the relationship between parental matchmaking and marriage outcomes. Does parental involvement in matchmaking help ensure their needs are better taken care of by married children? This paper finds supportive evidence using a survey of Chinese couples. In particular, parental involvement in matchmaking is associated with having a more submissive wife, a greater number of children, a higher likelihood of having any male children, and a stronger belief of the husband in providing old age support to his parents. These benefits, however, are achieved at the cost of less marital harmony within the couple and lower market income of the wife. The results render support to and extend the findings of Becker, Murphy and Spenkuch (2015) where parents meddle with children's preferences to ensure their commitment to providing parental goods such as old age support.
Located in MPRC People / Ginger Zhe Jin, Ph.D. / Ginger Zhe Jin Publications
Jamie Trevitt, University of Maryland Baltimore County
Post-abortion Contraception Preference
Located in Coming Up
Susan Parker, CIDE (Mexico)
Can conditional transfers reduce poverty of the next generation? Evidence from young adults after 15 years of a Mexican program
Located in Coming Up
Emily Wiemers, University of Massachusetts
Multigenerational Relationships and Economic Resources Among Black and White Families in the US
Located in Coming Up
Article ReferenceMaternal postpartum depressive symptoms and infant externalizing and internalizing behaviors
Maternal postpartum depression has been shown to be one of the main predictors of externalizing and internalizing behaviors in toddlers and adolescents. Research suggests that presence of such behaviors can be observed as early as infancy. The current study uses longitudinal data from 247 mothers to examine the relationship between postpartum depressive symptoms at 8 weeks and the infant's externalizing and internalizing behaviors at 12 months. In unadjusted linear regression models, there were associations between postpartum depressive symptoms and infant externalizing behaviors (β=0.082, SE=0.032, p=0.012) and internalizing behaviors (β=0.111, SE=0.037, p=0.003). After controlling for potential confounding factors, including maternal age, race, education, home ownership, smoking status in the postpartum period, marital status, parenting stress, and happiness from becoming a parent, the associations between postpartum depressive symptoms and infant externalizing (β=0.051, SE=0.034, p=0.138) and internalizing behaviors (β=0.077, SE=0.040, p=0.057) were reduced and became non-significant. Furthermore, in these models the total amount of variance explained was 17.2% (p<0.0001) for externalizing behaviors and 10.5% (p<0.01) for internalizing behaviors; the only significant predictor of externalizing behaviors was maternal age (β=-0.074, SE=0.030, p=0.014), and of internalizing behaviors was white non-Hispanic ethnicity (β=-1.33, SE=0.378, p=0.0005). A combined effect of the confounding factors seems to explain the finding of no significant independent association between postpartum depressive symptoms and infant externalizing and internalizing behaviors.
Located in MPRC People / Edmond Shenassa, Ph.D. / Edmond Shenassa Publications
New Developments at the Consortium on Race, Gender, and Ethnicity
New appointments, past and upcoming programs
Located in Research / Selected Research
Andrew J. Cherlin, Sociology, Johns Hopkins University
The Economy, the Family, and Working Class Discontent
Located in Coming Up
IPUMS - Time Use website launched
Hofferth and colleagues help make time use data readily accessible
Located in Research / Selected Research