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Sacoby Wilson describes community "sacrifice zones" in Wired
COVID impact on areas of high particulate concentrations is greater
Located in News
Rashawn Ray on community policing
Interview with Minnesota Public Radio explores implicit bias
Located in News
New York Times Article quotes Kearney in discussion of child care and opening the economy
Child care key to economy re-opening
Located in News
Rashawn Ray: Mental health professionals essential to police work
Baltimore Sun story reports police shooting
Located in News
Washington Post policing story cites Joseph Richardson
Police 'jump outs' target mostly Black youth
Located in News
Work mobility during COVID
NSF Rapid Response project will examine job restructuring, policy effects
Located in Research / Selected Research
Climate change is not a simplistic comparison of apartheid but entails global cooperation to deal with it
Alok Bhargava responds to Desmond Tutu's Comparison of Climate Change as Developed Countries' "Climate Apartheid" On the Poor
Located in Research / Selected Research
Alok Bhargava featured in Financial Times on Climate Change
Climate change is not a simplistic comparison of apartheid but entails global cooperation to deal with it
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Who Experiences Leisure Deficits? Mothers' Marital Status and Leisure Time
The authors used the 2003 to 2012 American Time Use Survey to examine marital status variation in mothers' leisure time. They found that never‐married mothers have more total leisure but less high‐quality leisure when compared with married mothers. Never‐married mothers' leisure is concentrated in passive and socially isolated activities that offer fewer social and health benefits. Black single mothers have the highest amount of socially isolated leisure, particularly watching television alone. Results suggest that differences in the context and type of leisure are salient dimensions of the divergent and stratified life conditions of married, divorced, and single mothers.
Located in MPRC People / Liana C. Sayer, Ph.D. / Liana Sayer Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Marital Status and Mothers’ Time Use: Childcare, Housework, Leisure, and Sleep
Assumptions that single mothers are “time poor” compared with married mothers are ubiquitous. We tested theorized associations derived from the time poverty thesis and the gender perspective using the 2003–2012 American Time Use Surveys (ATUS). We found marital status differentiated housework, leisure, and sleep time, but did not influence the amount of time that mothers provided childcare. Net of the number of employment hours, married mothers did more housework and slept less than never-married and divorced mothers, counter to expectations of the time poverty thesis. Never-married and cohabiting mothers reported more total and more sedentary leisure time than married mothers. We assessed the influence of demographic differences among mothers to account for variation in their time use by marital status. Compositional differences explained more than two-thirds of the variance in sedentary leisure time between married and never-married mothers, but only one-third of the variance between married and cohabiting mothers. The larger unexplained gap in leisure quality between cohabiting and married mothers is consistent with the gender perspective.
Located in MPRC People / Liana C. Sayer, Ph.D. / Liana Sayer Publications