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Article ReferenceAssociations between Obesity, Obesogenic Environments, and Structural Racism Vary by County-Level Racial Composition
O besity rates in the U.S. are associated with area-level, food-related characteristics. Studies have previously examined the role of structural racism (policies/practices that advantaged White Americans and deprived other racial/ethnic minority groups), but racial inequalities in socioeconomic status (SES) is a novel indicator. The aim of this study is to determine the associations between racial inequalities in SES with obesity and obesogenic environments. Data from 2007⁻2014 County Health Rankings and 2012⁻2016 County Business Patterns were combined to assess the associations between relative SES comparing Blacks to Whites with obesity, and number of grocery stores and fast food restaurants in U.S. counties. Random effects linear and Poisson regressions were used and stratified by county racial composition. Racial inequality in poverty, unemployment, and homeownership were associated with higher obesity rates. Racial inequality in median income, college graduates, and unemployment were associated with fewer grocery stores and more fast food restaurants. Associations varied by county racial composition. The results demonstrate that a novel indicator of structural racism on the county-level is associated with obesity and obesogenic environments. Associations vary by SES measure and county racial composition, suggesting the ability for targeted interventions to improve obesogenic environments and policies to eliminate racial inequalities in SES.
Located in Retired Persons / Caryn Bell, Ph.D. / Caryn Bell Publications
Assortative Mating and Autism Spectrum Disorder
New seed grant project headed by Judith Hellerstein investigates the causes of the rise in autism diagnoses
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Astri Syse, Statistics Norway
The role of family members' resources on an individual's health
Located in Coming Up
Atheendar S. Venkataramani, University of Pennsylvania
Maternal Mortality and Women's Political Power
Located in Coming Up
Audrey Dorelien, University of Minnesota
The Effects of In Utero Exposure to Influenza on Birth and Infant Outcomes in the US
Located in Coming Up
Audrey Dorélien, University of Minnesota
Racial/Ethnic Differences in US Social Contact Patterns and Implications for COVID-19
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Availability of Services Related to Achieving Pregnancy in U.S. Publicly Funded Family Planning Clinics
Background Recognizing that quality family planning services should include services to help clients who want to become pregnant, the objective of our analysis was to examine the distribution of services related to achieving pregnancy at publicly funded family planning clinics in the United States. Methods A nationally representative sample of publicly funded clinics was surveyed in 2013–2014 (n = 1615). Clinic administrators were asked about several clinical services and screenings related to achieving pregnancy: basic infertility services, reproductive life plan assessment, screening for body mass index, screening for sexually transmitted diseases, provision of natural family planning services, infertility treatment, and primary care services. The percentage of clinics offering each of these services was compared by Title X funding status; prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated after adjusting for clinic characteristics. Results Compared to non-Title X clinics, Title X clinics were more likely to offer reproductive life plan assessment (adjusted PR [aPR], 1.62; 95% CI, 1.42–1.84), body mass index screening for men (aPR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01–1.21), screening for sexually transmitted diseases (aPRs ranged from 1.21 to 1.37), and preconception health care for men (aPR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01–1.20). Title X clinics were less likely to offer infertility treatment (aPR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.40–0.74) and primary care services (aPR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.68–0.80) and were just as likely to offer basic infertility services, preconception health care services for women, natural family planning, and body mass index screening in women. Conclusions The availability of selected services related to achieving pregnancy differed by Title X status. A follow-up assessment after publication of national family planning recommendations is underway.
Located in MPRC People / Marie Thoma, Ph.D. / Marie Thoma Publications
Bachrach works to establish new population health association
Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science (IAHPS) now open for membership
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Barriers to health care access among US adults with chronic conditions and co-occurring serious psychological distress between 2011-2015
Importance: Nearly 34 million adults – 17 percent of all American adults – have co-occurring mental and physical health conditions. However, the extent to which increased health insurance coverage has facilitated access to needed health care services among this population remains unclear. Objective: Prior research suggests that people with serious psychological distress (SPD) and cancer, heart disease, diabetes, asthma, or hypertension report worse access to care than people with the same physical conditions but no SPD. While the recent expansion in health insurance coverage was expected to improve access to care for people with SPD, access barriers that people with SPD report remain underexplored. Setting: Using the cross-sectional data from the National Health Interview Survey 2011-2015, we examined self-reported health care access barriers among adults (between ages 18 to 64) with SPD and co-occurring physical health conditions. Results: Our sample included 45,294 individuals with chronic conditions (heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, or asthma). Among them, 3,639 also had SPD. After controlling for demographic and socioeconomic factors, results of multivariate logistic regressions showed that individuals with co-occurring SPD and a physical health condition were significantly more likely to report that they had worse health insurance coverage compared to the prior year (OR=1.32, p<0.01), that doctor's office informed that they were not accepting new patients (OR=2.09, p<0.001), that the doctor's office stated they did not accept the particular health insurance they have (OR=1.98, p<0.001), that they couldn't get an appointment soon enough (OR=2.42, p<0.001), they had no transportation to get to the doctor (OR=3.23, p<0.001), and that overall they had trouble finding a doctor/provider (OR=2.12, p<0.001). Conclusions: Our results suggest that despite an increase in health insurance coverage between 2011 and 2015, barriers to access remain a significant concern for individuals with co-occurring SPD and physical health conditions.
Located in MPRC People / Jie Chen, Ph.D. / Jie Chen Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Behavioral health treatment utilization among individuals with co-occurring opioid use disorder and mental illness: Evidence from a national survey
BACKGROUND: Past research shows that among individuals with substance use disorders, the presence of a co-occurring mental illness can influence the initiation, course, and success of behavioral health treatment, but little research has examined people with opioid use disorder (OUD) specifically. METHODS: Using the 2008-2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, this study examines the utilization of substance use disorder and mental health treatment among individuals with OUD and different degrees of mental illness severity. The study also examined types of treatment, perceived unmet need for treatment, and barriers to care. RESULTS: 47% of individuals with OUD and co-occurring mild/moderate mental illness did not receive any behavioral health treatment, and 21% of those with co-occurring serious mental illnesses did not receive any behavioral health treatment. Among those with OUD and co-occurring mild/moderate mental illness, 16% reported receiving both substance use disorder and mental health treatment; among those with co-occurring serious mental illness the rate was 32%. The most common form of treatment was prescription medication for mental health, and this was true regardless of whether or not the individual had any mental illness. More than 50% of the study population reported financial difficulties as a barrier to treatment. CONCLUSION: A high proportion of individuals with OUD and co-occurring mental illness are not receiving needed care. However, nearly one in five of those with OUD but no diagnosed mental illness is receiving prescription medication for mental illness. These findings suggest that there is a need to better facilitate access to and coordinate behavioral health care across settings for individuals with OUD. Published by Elsevier Inc.
Located in MPRC People / Jie Chen, Ph.D. / Jie Chen Publications