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Cynthia Feliciano, Washington University in St. Louis
Contextual Inequalities and Socioeconomic Outcomes among Adult Children of U.S. Immigrants
Located in Coming Up
Dagher and Green: Substance abuse and depression in young adulthood may have long-term socioeconomic effects
Treatment for substance abuse and mental health problems should be integrated in order to achieve better outcomes
Located in News
Dagher: Prevention of postpartum depression could yield health care cost savings
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health R18 study is first to examine the relation between postpartum depression and health services expenditures
Located in Research / Selected Research
Dan Tang, Visiting Associate Professor in Maryland Population Research Center
Living Arrangements, Social Networks and Depressive Symptoms Among Urban and Rural Older Adults in China
Located in Coming Up
Das Gupta research cited in Gorakhpur tragedy story
Opinion piece calls to make "provision of public goods" central to Indian democracy
Located in News
Dean Spears, University of Texas at Austin
Neonatal death in private hospitals in north India: Preliminary evidence of a new mortality puzzle
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Decision rightness and relief predominate over the years following an abortion
A recent analysis from the Turnaway study focused on women who were just under the gestational limit of a clinic and received an abortion and those who had first trimester abortions to examine trends in decisional rightness and negative and positive emotions over 5 years after the abortion. Specifically, Rocca et al. (in press) analyzed these data and found that women were overwhemingly sure of their decision: 95% felt their decision was the right one at each assessment after their abortion, and the predicted probability of abortion being the right decision was 99% at 5 years afterwards. Relief was the most common emotion felt by women, and negative emotions or decision regret did not emerge over time. These results and others from studies conducted globally counter assertions by abortion opponents that women are not certain of their decisions, or that women regret or have mainly negative emotions about their abortions if not in the short run then after a long period of time. This commentary addresses not only these findings but also relevant U.S. abortion policies based on these unsubstantiated claims. Policies should not be based on the notions that women are unsure of their decision, come to regret, it or have negative emotions because there is no evidence to support these claims.
Located in MPRC People / Julia Steinberg, Ph.D. / Julia Steinberg Publications
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Declining Help in a Declining Economy: Trends in US Informal Volunteering: 2003-2013
John P. Robinson, University of Maryland; 2015-007
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Depression and contraceptive behavioral patterns: Analyzing two longitudinal studies
Julia Steinberg, Family Science
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Dept. of African American Studies John B. Slaughter Endowment Lecture by Dr. Kristin Turney
“The Waiting Game”: The Pervasiveness and Proliferation of Anticipatory Stress During Jail Incarceration
Located in Coming Up