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Taylor Hargrove, University of North Carolina
Health Contextualized: Inequalities in Physiological Function at the Intersection of Race, Skin Color, and Place
Located in Coming Up
Article ReferenceTeen Mothers’ Family Support and Adult Identity in the Emerging Adulthood: Implications for Socioeconomic Attainment Later in Life
We examined the prospective role of parental support and adult identity profiles in the transition to adulthood on teen mothers’ socioeconomic outcomes in adulthood. Analyses were based on the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, a nationally representative sample of youth followed over a decade. We used data from Waves 1, 3, and 4 (mean age = 28.6, Wave 4). Analytical sample consisted of 981 females who gave birth before age 20. Analysis included design-based regression models. Findings from adjusted regression models showed no statistically significant associations between teen mothers’ parental support and socioeconomic outcomes. While teen mothers have already achieved an important marker of adulthood, variability in adult identity profiles was observed. Teen mothers with older subjective age, regardless of their levels of psychosocial maturation, had higher socioeconomic attainment on some indicators. Findings suggest that teen mothers’ adult identity profiles differentiate their socioeconomic trajectories later in life.
Located in MPRC People / Kerry Green, Ph.D. / Kerry Green Publications
Teens, Technology, and Dating Violence
Donna Howard and colleagues are studying the impact of electronic communication technologies on dating violence
Located in Research / Selected Research
Texas team re-calculates maternal mortality rate
MacDorman findings from 2016 addressed, somewhat
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The association between interpregnancy interval and severe maternal morbidities using revised national birth certificate data: A probabilistic bias analysis
Severe maternal morbidity continues to be on the rise in the US. Short birth spacing is a modifiable risk factor associated with maternal morbidity, yet few studies have examined this association, possibly due to few available data sources to examine these rare events. To examine the association between interpregnancy interval (IPI) and severe maternal morbidity using near‐national birth certificate data and account for known under‐reporting using probabilistic bias analysis. We used revised 2014‐2017 birth certificate data, restricting to resident women with a non–first‐born singleton birth. We examined the following: (a) maternal blood transfusion, (b) admission to intensive care unit (ICU), (c) uterine rupture (among women with a prior caesarean delivery) and (d) third‐ or fourth‐degree perineal laceration (among vaginal deliveries) by IPI categories (<6, 6‐11, 12‐17, 18‐23, 24‐59 and 60+ months). Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using log‐binomial regression, adjusting for select maternal characteristics. Probabilistic bias analyses were performed. Compared with IPI 18 to 23 months, adjusted models revealed that the risk of maternal transfusion followed a U‐shaped curve with IPI, while risk of ICU admission and perineal laceration increased with longer IPI. Risk of uterine rupture was highest among IPI <6 months. With the exception of maternal transfusion, these findings persisted regardless of the extent or type of misclassification examined in bias analyses. Associations between IPI and maternal morbidity varied by outcome, even after adjusting for misclassification of SMM. Differences across maternal health outcomes should be considered when counselling and making recommendations regarding optimal birth spacing.
Located in MPRC People / Marie Thoma, Ph.D. / Marie Thoma Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The Coming Divorce Decline
This article analyzes U.S. divorce trends over the past decade and considers their implications for future divorce rates. Modeling women’s odds of divorce from 2008 to 2017 using marital events data from the American Community Survey, I find falling divorce rates with or without adjustment for demographic covariates. Age-specific divorce rates show that the trend is driven by younger women, which is consistent with longer term trends showing uniquely high divorce rates among people born in the Baby Boom period. Finally, I analyze the characteristics of newly married women and estimate the trend in their likelihood of divorcing based on the divorce models. The results show falling divorce risks for more recent marriages. The accumulated evidence thus points toward continued decline in divorce rates. The United States is progressing toward a system in which marriage is rarer and more stable than it was in the past.
Located in MPRC People / Philip Cohen, Ph.D. / Philip Cohen Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The cost of access: Racial disparities in student loan burdens of young adults
Student loans have become a social-financial issue in the United States. This study uses a nationally representative dataset to examine the association between financial socialization and student loan borrowing behavior of individuals after controlling a number of different socio-demographic factors. Results show that the financial burdens of college education, such as borrowing and the dollar amounts of a loan, are higher for Blacks, however, their college attendance is significantly lower than Whites. Blacks are more independent and receive less financial support from family and relatives than Whites. The wealth gap that exists between Black and White parents may contribute to the disparity. Additional financial resources for higher education as well as financial education and counseling may be needed to create better academic access for the vulnerable underserved groups including minority students.
Located in MPRC People / Jinhee Kim, Ph.D. / JinHee Kim Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The Economic Gap Among Women in Time Spent on Housework in Former West Germany and Sweden
The quantitative scholarship on domestic labor has documented the existence of a gender gap in its performance in all countries for which data are available. Only recently have researchers begun to analyze economic disparities  among  women in their time spent doing housework, and their studies have been largely limited to the U.S. We extend this line of inquiry using data from two European countries, the former West Germany and Sweden. We estimate the “economic gap” in women’s housework time, which we define as the difference between the time spent by women at the lowest and highest deciles of their own earnings. We expect this gap to be smaller in Sweden given its celebrated success at reducing both gender and income inequality. Though Swedish women do spend less time on domestic labor, however, and though there is indeed less earnings inequality among them, the economic gap in their housework is only a little smaller than among women in the former West Germany. In both places, a significant negative association between women’s individual earnings and their housework time translates into economic gaps of more than 2.5 hours per week. Moreover, in both countries, women at the highest earnings decile experience a gender gap in housework that is smaller by about 4 hours per week compared to their counterparts at the lowest decile.
Located in MPRC People / Liana C. Sayer, Ph.D. / Liana Sayer Publications
File Troff document (with manpage macros)The Gender Revolution and the Second Demographic Transition: Understanding Recent Family Trends in Industrialized Societies
Frances Goldscheider, University of Maryland; 2014-001
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
The Healthy Generations Program: Improving Access to Mental Health Care
New model of integrated service delivery makes mental health services more accessible to teenaged parents
Located in Research / Selected Research