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FileHousehold Structure and School Attendance in 57 Countries: Why Children with Absent Fathers Do Better in Some Places
Laurie DeRose, University of Maryland; 2014-010
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
File Troff document (with manpage macros)How Do They Do It? The Immigrant Paradox in the Transition to Adulthood
Sandra Hofferth and U.J. Moon, University of Maryland // Keywords: Immigrants, children, transition to adulthood, education, employment, extracurricular activities, culture; 2016-004
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
How Does Parental Stress Affect Child Outcomes?
Natasha Cabrera has completed a paper on “Parenting and early predictors of Latino children’s cognitive and social development: Direct and Indirect Effects”
Located in Research / Selected Research
How Does the Amount of Time Mothers Spend with Children Matter?
Dr. Milkie's research helps to reshape cultural frames regarding maternal time and children's well being
Located in Research / Selected Research
File Troff document (with manpage macros)How Does the Amount of Time Mothers Spend with Children Matter?
Melissa Milke and Kathleen Denny, University of Maryland; Kei M. Nomaguchi, Bowling Green State University; 2012-015
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
How Does Time Use Data Illuminate Important Social Patterns?
Liana Sayer starts a new Time Use Lab at the University of Maryland
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article ReferenceImplications of Unstable Trends in Marriage, Birth, and Divorce
Using birth, marriage, and divorce data from the U.S. Census, this study examines the stability in trends between 1920 and 2008. Our investigation substantiates the reactive nature of family trends to any intervention or change in its environment. We find that changes in family trends, which might have been initiated by changes in policies or other interventions, are permanent and do not fade away by reversing policies or interventions. Hence, family and consumer scientists, policymakers, and practitioners must explicitly allow for unstable trends when researching or targeting the dynamics of birth, marriage, and divorce, and prescribing interventions that they view as stabilizers of family dynamics.
Located in MPRC People / Manouchehr (Mitch) Mokhtari, Ph.D. / Mitch Mokhtari Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Individual- and Family-Level Correlates of Socio-Emotional Functioning among African American Youth from Single-Mother Homes: A Compensatory Resilience Model
The majority of research on African American adolescents raised in single-mother homes has focused on externalizing problems, with less attention to other facets of socio-emotional functioning. Using a compensatory resilience approach, the current study examined risk and protective factors at the family (maternal warmth, monitoring, psychological control) and youth (ethnic identity and religiosity) levels as predictors of depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and self-esteem among African American adolescents from single-mother homes ( n  = 193). Lower levels of psychological control, higher levels of monitoring, and higher levels of youth ethnic identity were associated with at least one of the outcomes, depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and self-esteem. In addition, self-esteem, but not hopelessness, mediated the associations between the family- and youth-level factors and youth depressive symptoms. The importance of targeting maternal psychological control and youth ethnic identity, as well as self-esteem, in intervention programs for African American youth from single-mother families is discussed.
Located in MPRC People / Cecily Hardaway, Ph.D. / Cecily Hardaway Publications
Institutional Change and the Consequences of Military Service
In a Collaborative Research project funded by the National Science Foundation, Meredith Kleykamp looks at outcomes in marriage, education, employment and earnings among veterans and non-veterans over the last 40 years.
Located in Research / Selected Research
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Intentionally or Ambivalently Risking a Short Inter-pregnancy Interval: Reproductive Readiness Factors in Women’s Postpartum Non-Use of Contraception
Michael S. Rendall, Eowna Young Harrison, Mónica Caudillo, University of Maryland; 2018-003
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents