Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

You are here: Home

Search results

351 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type









































New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Family Processes, Intergenerational Learning and Involved Fathering
MPRC associates are collaborating on a component project that investigates intergenerational mechanisms through which “responsible fathering” may be transmitted.
Located in Research / Selected Research
Family Structure and Educational Progress: A Macro-Level Gendered Perspective Across Low- and Lower-Middle Income Countries
Laurie DeRose, Research Assistant Professor, Maryland Population Research Center
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Family Structure Change Among Latinos: Variation by Ecologic Risk
We examined differences in family structure change in an urban sample of mothers (N = 1,314) from their child’s birth to age 5 and whether ecological risk moderated this association. We found that compared with U.S.-born Latino mothers, foreign-born Latino mothers were 62% less likely to break up and 75% less likely to repartner than remain stably resident. Across nativity status, Latina mothers with fewer children, more economic stress, less income, and less frequently reported father involvement were more likely to break up and repartner than remain stably resident. We found no moderation effects of ecological risk.
Located in MPRC People / Natasha Cabrera, Ph.D. / Natasha Cabrera Publications
Feinian Chen on CBS This Morning: Childcare in China
Childcare in China is a family affair; in U.S. such care varies by ethnic group
Located in News
Fish editorial published in AJPH
So-called “conversion therapy” efforts create serious harm for youth that are LGBTQ
Located in News
Fish wins NIH award for work dedicated to LGBTQ people's health
Notes elevated rates of suicidal ideation and substance abuse
Located in News
Florencia Torche, Stanford University
The COVID-19 Pandemic and Infant Health: A Population-Level Analysis
Located in Coming Up
Frances Goldscheider honored by Stockholm University
Awarded honorary doctorate for contributions to Social Science
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Gay‐Straight Alliances, Inclusive Policy, and School Climate: LGBTQ Youths’ Experiences of Social Support and Bullying
Gay‐Straight Alliances (GSA) and school policies focused on support for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning youth may reduce bias‐based bullying and enhance social supports in schools. Using multivariate regression, we tested the relationship between youth reports of the presence of GSAs and LGBTQ‐focused policies, independently and mutually, with experiences bullying and perceived support ( n  =   1,061). Youth reported higher classmate support in the presence of GSAs and higher teacher support in the presence of LGBTQ‐focused policies; the presence of both GSAs and LGBTQ‐focused policies was associated with less bullying and higher perceived classmate and teacher support. The findings indicate that GSAs and LGBTQ‐focused policies are distinctly and mutually important for fostering safer and more supportive school climates for youth.
Located in MPRC People / Jessica N Fish, Ph.D. / Jessica N Fish Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Gender Differences in Contribution to Domestic work Associated with Outsourcing in Korea
With a rapid economic achievement, education and socio-economic status of Korean women has also considerably improved. 40.0% of total women held bachelor’s degrees in 2015, which was only 1.6% in 1970. College entrance rate of women was estimated at 32.4% in 1990 but increased to 73.5% in 2017, even higher than men (66.3%). As more women are educated and employed conflicting with traditional gender role and values, one of strategies to deal with housework or childcare is outsourcing. According to the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs (2015), 25% of married couples with children received help from their parents for housework or childcare, and it increased to 53% for dual earning couples. Choi (2016) explains that married couples depend on their parents and babysitters for young children, while they depend on nursery and kindergarten as children get older. Then how much does outsourcing reduce a demand for housework and childcare? Will it change the contribution to domestic work between couple? Despite the prevalence of domestic outsourcing in Korea, none of previous studies have investigated its relationship with couple’s time worked at home. In this paper, we examine how paid or unpaid helper is associated with time spent on housework or childcare by wife and husband respectively, using panel data for nine years with individual fixed effects. We also examine how the outsourcing is associated with husband’s relative contribution to domestic work compared to wife, by types of housework.
Located in MPRC People / Jinhee Kim, Ph.D. / JinHee Kim Publications