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Wade Jacobsen, UMD Criminology
Juvenile Arrest and Interpersonal Exclusion: Rejection, Withdrawal, and Homophily among Peers
Located in Coming Up
Was the Great Recession really responsible for falling divorce rates?
Cohen study casts doubt on "Silver Linings" divorce rate hypothesis
Located in News
Wendy Manning, Bowling Green State University
Continuity and Change in Verbal Conflict and Intimate Partner Violence During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Prospective Analysis of Adults
Located in Coming Up
What is behind gender inequality in college ?
Women are completing university in greater percentages than men but do not choose high-income fields
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)WHERE HAVE ALL THE CHILDREN GONE? AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF CHILD ABANDONMENT AND ABDUCTION IN CHINA
In the past 40 years, a large number of children have been abandoned by their families or have been abducted in China. We argue that the implementation of the one-child policy has significantly increased both child abandonment and child abduction and that, furthermore, the cultural preference for sons in China has shaped unique gender-based patterns whereby a majority of the children who are abandoned are girls and a majority of the children who are abducted are boys. We provide empirical evidence for the following findings: (1) Stricter one-child policy implementation leads to more child abandonment locally and more child abduction in neighboring regions; (2) A stronger son-preference bias in a given region intensifies both the local effects and spatial spillover effects of the region's one-child policy on child abandonment and abduction; and (3) With the gradual relaxation of the one-child policy after 2002, both child abandonment and child abduction have dropped significantly. This paper is the first to provide empirical evidence on the unintended consequences of the one-child policy in terms of child trafficking in China.
Located in MPRC People / Sebastian Galiani, Ph.D. / Sebastian Galiani Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Who Experiences Leisure Deficits? Mothers' Marital Status and Leisure Time
The authors used the 2003 to 2012 American Time Use Survey to examine marital status variation in mothers' leisure time. They found that never‐married mothers have more total leisure but less high‐quality leisure when compared with married mothers. Never‐married mothers' leisure is concentrated in passive and socially isolated activities that offer fewer social and health benefits. Black single mothers have the highest amount of socially isolated leisure, particularly watching television alone. Results suggest that differences in the context and type of leisure are salient dimensions of the divergent and stratified life conditions of married, divorced, and single mothers.
Located in MPRC People / Liana C. Sayer, Ph.D. / Liana Sayer Publications
Why Women Live Longer
Faculty Associate Philip Cohen points to male smoking habits as an important factor in understanding the relative longevity of women
Located in News
Wildfires and Child Health
Faculty Associate Michel Boudreaux leads an R01 to measure impact of increasing particulant pollution on child health
Located in Research / Selected Research
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Women’s Sequencing of First Births Relative to First Substantial Employment Before and After the 1990’s Welfare Reforms
Michael S. Rendall, University of Maryland and Rachel Shattuck, U.S. Census Bureau; 2016-002
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Yingchun Ji, MPRC Visiting Scholar and Shanghai University
Mingle Modernity with Tradition: Women Providing for the Elderly in Transitional China
Located in Coming Up