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Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Pathways to Depressive Symptoms among Former Inmates
Drawing on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we examine the association between incarceration and depressive symptoms among a sample of 13,131 young adults. We find that a history of incarceration is associated with a higher expected rate of depressive symptoms and that this relationship operates most strongly through material hardship. We find no differences in the main effect of incarceration across groups, but we find that the role of certain mediating variables may vary, with marital and employment status being a stronger mediator for males than females, and marriage being a stronger mediator for whites compared to blacks and Hispanics. Our results suggest that incarceration constitutes a potent stressor, but that the pathways to depressive symptoms may differ.
Located in MPRC People / Lauren Porter, Ph.D. / Lauren Porter Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The Consequences of Contact with the Criminal Justice System for Health in Emerging Adulthood
A rapidly growing literature has documented the adverse social, economic and, recently, health impacts of experiencing incarceration in the United States. Despite the insights that this work has provided in consistently documenting the deleterious effects of incarceration, little is known about the specific timing of criminal justice contact and early health consequences during the transition from adolescence to adulthood-a critical period in the life course, particularly for the development of poor health. Previous literature on the role of incarceration has also been hampered by the difficulties of parsing out the influence that incarceration exerts on health from the social and economic confounding forces that are linked to both criminal justice contact and health. This paper addresses these two gaps in the literature by examining the association between incarceration and health in the United States during the transition to adulthood, and by using an analytic approach that better isolates the association of incarceration with health from the multitude of confounders which could be alternatively driving this association. In this endeavor, we make use of variable-rich data from The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (n = 10,785) and a non-parametric Bayesian machine learning technique- Bayesian Additive Regression Trees. Our results suggest that the experience of incarceration at this stage of the life course increases the probability of depression, adversely affects the perception of general health status, but has no effect on the probability of developing hypertension in early adulthood. These findings signal that incarceration in emerging adulthood is an important stressor that can have immediate implications for mental and general health in early adulthood, and may help to explain long lasting implications incarceration has for health across the life course.
Located in MPRC People / Lauren Porter, Ph.D. / Lauren Porter Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros) Blatant, Subtle and Insidious: URM Faculty Perceptions of Discriminatory Practices in Predominantly White Institutions
Although modest gains are observed in the number of African American, Mexican American, and Puerto Rican faculty in higher education institutions, systemic issues of underrepresentation and retention remain problematic. This article describes how historically underrepresented minority (URM) faculty in Predominantly White Institutions perceive discrimination and illustrates the ways in which discriminatory institutional practices—such as microaggressions—manifest and contribute to unwelcoming institutional climates and workplace stress. Using a mixed methods approach, including survey data and individual and group interviews, findings show that respondents ( n  = 543) encounter racial discrimination from colleagues and administrators; experience discrimination differently based on their race/ethnicity and gender; and report difficulties in describing racist encounters. Qualitative data reveal three themes that inform the survey results on perceived discrimination: (1) blatant, outright, subtle, and insidious racism; (2) devaluation of scholarly contributions, merit, and skillset by colleagues and administrators; and (3) the burden of “representing minorities,” or a “racial/ethnic tax.” Propositions for how to change unwelcoming environments and create safe spaces for professional development to reduce the adverse effects of discrimination among URM faculty are discussed.
Located in MPRC People / Ruth Zambrana, Ph.D. / Ruth Zambrana Publications
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Occupational Differences in Estimates of Time at Work
John P. Robinson, University of Maryland; Jonathan Gershuny, University of Oxford; 2012-006
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Recession and Divorce in the United States: Economic Conditions and the Odds of Divorce, 2008-2010
Philip N. Cohen, University of Maryland; 2012-008
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
File Troff document (with manpage macros)When and Where Does Achievement Inequality Grow? Ecology, the City and Social Disorganization
Odis Johnson Jr., University of Maryland; 2012-012
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
State of Hispanic Race and Ethnicity: Census 2020 Changes and Implications For Addressing Social Inequalities
Half-day Conference by Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity and co-sponsored with MPRC
Located in Coming Up
Desai leads establishment of National Data Innovation Centre in New Delhi
Far-reaching program will stimulate research, support graduate student development in India and U.S.
Located in Research / Selected Research
WANG Feng, University of California, Irvine (UCI)
Fiscal Implications of Population Aging and Economic Change in China
Located in Coming Up
Hofferth, Sayer lead Time Use Data for Health and Well Being
R01 provides five years of funding to continue development of the IPUMS-Time Use tool
Located in Research / Selected Research