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Maria Stanfors, Lund University, Sweden
Two for the price of one? Economic consequences of motherhood in contemporary Sweden.
Located in Coming Up
Pablo Gracia, Trinity College
Children's and Adolescents' Daily Activities in Spain: Do Parental Work Schedules Matter?
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Who Experiences Leisure Deficits? Mothers' Marital Status and Leisure Time
The authors used the 2003 to 2012 American Time Use Survey to examine marital status variation in mothers' leisure time. They found that never‐married mothers have more total leisure but less high‐quality leisure when compared with married mothers. Never‐married mothers' leisure is concentrated in passive and socially isolated activities that offer fewer social and health benefits. Black single mothers have the highest amount of socially isolated leisure, particularly watching television alone. Results suggest that differences in the context and type of leisure are salient dimensions of the divergent and stratified life conditions of married, divorced, and single mothers.
Located in MPRC People / Liana C. Sayer, Ph.D. / Liana Sayer Publications
Article ReferenceThe rising marriage mortality gap among Whites
Although the decline in marriage has been cited as a possible contributor to the “despair” afflicting marginalized White communities, these studies have not directly considered mortality by marital status. This paper uses complete death certificate data from the Mortality Multiple Cause Files with American Community Survey data to examine age-specific mortality rates for married and non-married people from 2007 to 2017. The overall rise in White mortality is limited almost exclusively to those who are not married, for men and women. By comparison, mortality for Blacks and Hispanics has fallen or remained flat regardless of marital status (except for young, single Hispanic men). Analysis by education level shows death rates have risen most for Whites with the lowest education, but have also increased for those with high school or some college. Because mortality has risen faster for unmarried Whites at all but the lowest education levels, there has been an increase in the marriage mortality ratio. Mortality differentials are an increasingly important component of the social hierarchy associated with marital status.
Located in MPRC People / Philip Cohen, Ph.D. / Philip Cohen Publications
Fragile Families Summer Data Workshop
June 15-17, 2016, Columbia University
Located in Resources / / Announcements / Archive
Ashton Verdery, Penn State University
Older Adult Family Structure and Mortality (co-authored work with Sarah Patterson and Rachel Margolis)
Located in Coming Up
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Intentionally or Ambivalently Risking a Short Inter-pregnancy Interval: Reproductive Readiness Factors in Women’s Postpartum Non-Use of Contraception
Michael S. Rendall, Eowna Young Harrison, Mónica Caudillo, University of Maryland; 2018-003
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Conrad Hackett and Stephanie Kramer, Pew Research Center
How demography is reshaping the global religious landscape
Located in Coming Up
Vida Maralani, Cornell University
Buying Time with Children: Women’s Employment and Time-Intensive Parenting across the Life Course
Located in Coming Up
CANCELED: Connie Gager, Montclair State University
Union Dissolution or Conflict?: The Interactive Effect of Parental Marital Status and Conflict on Adult Children’s Relationship Conflict
Located in Coming Up