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Expectations for male provision and women's sexual health risks in sub-Saharan Africa
Stoebenau took a mixed-methods approach to develop the Gender Role and Male Provision Expectation scale
Located in Research / Selected Research
Rebecca Thornton, Baylor University
Long-Lasting Effects of Bible Translations on Literacy: Evidence from Sub-Sahara Africa
Located in Coming Up
Joint Presentation by: Sangeetha Madhavan, Kirsten Stoebenau, and Ken Leonard
Does Kinship Matter in Low Income Urban Contexts in sub-Saharan Africa?: New Findings from Nairobi, Kenya
Located in Coming Up
The opioid epidemic's effects on families
Caudillo and Cohen investigate how family structures have changed with rising opioid epidemic death rates
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Spousal migration and married adults’ psychological distress in rural China: The roles of intimacy, autonomy and responsibility
Spousal separation due to migration is a prevalent phenomenon in the developing world, but its psychological consequences for left-behind partners are largely understudied. Using data from 2010, 2012 and 2014 China Family Panel Studies (CFPS), this paper first examined whether spousal migration causes rural married adults any psychological distress; this finding was then advanced by testing the mechanisms that could potentially explain the linkage between these two variables. Inverse Probability Weighting (IPW) for multivalued treatment effect models and paired Propensity Score Matching (PSM) have been used to correct the potential selection bias of spousal migration. The results show that prolonged spousal separation through migration increases the depressive symptoms of married adults in rural China, and the detrimental effects on left-behind spouses' psychological well-being can be explained by the reduced level of emotional intimacy between husband and wife, and partially by women becoming the master of the household. Considering that being the master of the household is accompanied by elevated stress levels associated with increasing family responsibilities, further examination showed that economic resources can buffer the negative effect associated with being the master of the household when the spouse migrates. However, we did not find that time use is an effective mechanism to link spousal migration and left-behind spouses’ well-being.
Located in Retired Persons / Feinian Chen, Ph.D. / Feinian Chen Publications
Local violence accelerates cohabiting union transitions among disadvantaged women
Mónica Caudillo investigates this using national survey data from Mexico
Located in Research / Selected Research
Clare Barrington, University of North Carolina
PrEP Up!: a mixed methods study of stigma and pre-exposure prophylaxis use in Guatemala
Located in Coming Up
Corinne Low, University of Pennsylvania
Traditional Institutions in Modern Times: Dowries as Pensions When Sons Migrate
Located in Coming Up
Sonalde Desai, Department of Sociology at UMD
The Global Aspirational Class and Its Demographic Fortunes
Located in Coming Up
Gunnar Andersson, Stockholm University
Union formation in Sweden during the recent period of fertility decline: trends and correlates
Located in Coming Up