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Seminar Series: Teen Fatherhood & Educational Attainment: Evidence from Three Cohorts of Youth
H. Elizabeth Peters, Director, Center on Labor, Human Services & Population, Urban Institute
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: The Effect of Divorce on Time Allocation
Katie Genadek, Research Assistant, Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Will the 2nd Half of the Gender Revolution Strengthen the Family? Evidence from the U.S. and Sweden
Frances Goldscheider, Professor, Department of Family Science, University of Maryland
Located in Coming Up
Seminar: Andrew Foster - Brown University
Household Recombination, Retrospective Evaluation and Educational Mobility over 40 years
Located in Coming Up
Seminar: Anna Haskins - Cornell University
Schools as Surveilling Institutions? Paternal Incarceration, System Avoidance, and Parental Involvement in Schooling
Located in Coming Up
Seminar: Deprivation or Difference? Factors Shaping the Marital Quality of Cross-Border Marriages
Susanne Choi, Fulbright Scholar, Department of Sociology, Harvard University
Located in Coming Up
Seminar: Jim Raymo - University of Wisconsin
Women’s education and marriage in Japan: Insights into Social Change (and Stability)
Located in Coming Up
Seminar: Recent Trends in Cross-Border Marriage in Korea: A Focus on Spousal Dissimilarity, Marital Stability and Fertility
Doo-Sub Kim, Professor, Department of Sociology, Hanyan University
Located in Coming Up
Seminar: Zodiacal Birth Timing Cycles in East Asia: An Update
Daniel Goodkind, Demographer, Independent Researcher, Arlington Virginia
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Sexual and Gender Minority Youth Alcohol Use: Within-Group Differences in Associations with Internalized Stigma and Victimization
Sexual and gender minority (SGM) youth are more likely to use alcohol than their heterosexual cisgender peers. At the same time, SGM youth experience sexuality- and gender identity-specific stressors known to exacerbate negative health outcomes. Though scholars have established a link between minority stressors (e.g., internalized stigma and victimization) and increased alcohol use for SGM youth as a whole, there is little indication of whether internalized stigma and victimization are more strongly associated with alcohol use for specific groups of SGM youth. A United States sample of 11,811 racially and geographically diverse 13–17 year old SGM youth was used to employ a series of gender-stratified multivariable regression models to examine the association among internalized stigma, victimization, and alcohol-related behaviors, and whether they differed for specific groups of sexual minority youth. Sexual orientation moderated several associations between sexual minority stressors (i.e., victimization and stigma) and youth’s alcohol use (i.e., recent use and heavy episodic drinking) across models stratified by gender (i.e., male, female, and non-binary). For example, bisexual boys had stronger associations between SGM-specific victimization and alcohol use frequency and heavy episodic drinking relative to gay boys; conversely, victimization and alcohol use frequency were more weakly associated among bisexual girls relative to lesbian/gay girls. Pansexual girls showed weaker associations between internalized stigma and alcohol use frequency compared to lesbian/gay girls. This paper demonstrates who among SGM youth are more likely to engage in alcohol-related behaviors as a function of differential forms of SGM-related victimization and stigma. These findings can inform substance use interventions that are tailored to youth of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities.
Located in MPRC People / Jessica N Fish, Ph.D. / Jessica N Fish Publications