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Cohen: Marriage is "rarer and more stable"
Cohen notes achievement of status as an element of contemporary marriage trends
Located in News
Dyadic patterns in childbirth intention
Monica Caudillo, with MPRC affiliate colleagues, uses National Survey of Family Growth Data for Population Research and Policy Review article
Located in Research / Selected Research
Cohen comments on incentives for child bearing
Offers alternatives to payments
Located in News
Kinship, Nuptiality and Child Health Outcomes in a Low Income Urban Area - JAMAA na AFYA ya MTOTO (JAMO)
Sangeetha Madhavan PI, with Kristen Stoebenau, Kenneth Leonard and Michael Wagner
Located in Research / Selected Research
IPUMS - Time Use website launched
Hofferth and colleagues help make time use data readily accessible
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Gender Differences in Contribution to Domestic work Associated with Outsourcing in Korea
With a rapid economic achievement, education and socio-economic status of Korean women has also considerably improved. 40.0% of total women held bachelor’s degrees in 2015, which was only 1.6% in 1970. College entrance rate of women was estimated at 32.4% in 1990 but increased to 73.5% in 2017, even higher than men (66.3%). As more women are educated and employed conflicting with traditional gender role and values, one of strategies to deal with housework or childcare is outsourcing. According to the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs (2015), 25% of married couples with children received help from their parents for housework or childcare, and it increased to 53% for dual earning couples. Choi (2016) explains that married couples depend on their parents and babysitters for young children, while they depend on nursery and kindergarten as children get older. Then how much does outsourcing reduce a demand for housework and childcare? Will it change the contribution to domestic work between couple? Despite the prevalence of domestic outsourcing in Korea, none of previous studies have investigated its relationship with couple’s time worked at home. In this paper, we examine how paid or unpaid helper is associated with time spent on housework or childcare by wife and husband respectively, using panel data for nine years with individual fixed effects. We also examine how the outsourcing is associated with husband’s relative contribution to domestic work compared to wife, by types of housework.
Located in MPRC People / Jinhee Kim, Ph.D. / JinHee Kim Publications
Philip Cohen featured in USA Today on U.S. Divorce Rate
Millennials are contributing to the declining divorce rate in U.S.
Located in News
Steinberg study contradicts long-standing 'link' between abortion and suicide
Equivalent risk before and after abortion
Located in News
Melissa Kearney featured in The New York Times on the interaction between economic growth and family formation
Social context partially determines the family formation response to a positive income or earnings shock
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)WHERE HAVE ALL THE CHILDREN GONE? AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF CHILD ABANDONMENT AND ABDUCTION IN CHINA
In the past 40 years, a large number of children have been abandoned by their families or have been abducted in China. We argue that the implementation of the one-child policy has significantly increased both child abandonment and child abduction and that, furthermore, the cultural preference for sons in China has shaped unique gender-based patterns whereby a majority of the children who are abandoned are girls and a majority of the children who are abducted are boys. We provide empirical evidence for the following findings: (1) Stricter one-child policy implementation leads to more child abandonment locally and more child abduction in neighboring regions; (2) A stronger son-preference bias in a given region intensifies both the local effects and spatial spillover effects of the region's one-child policy on child abandonment and abduction; and (3) With the gradual relaxation of the one-child policy after 2002, both child abandonment and child abduction have dropped significantly. This paper is the first to provide empirical evidence on the unintended consequences of the one-child policy in terms of child trafficking in China.
Located in MPRC People / Sebastian Galiani, Ph.D. / Sebastian Galiani Publications