Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

You are here: Home

Search results

235 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type









































New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Barbara Okun, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
How grandparental death and aging affect the fertility of adult children: A demographic analysis
Located in Coming Up
Maria Stanfors, Lund University, Sweden
Two for the price of one? Economic consequences of motherhood in contemporary Sweden.
Located in Coming Up
Pablo Gracia, Trinity College
Children's and Adolescents' Daily Activities in Spain: Do Parental Work Schedules Matter?
Located in Coming Up
Hofferth, Sayer lead Time Use Data for Health and Well Being
R01 provides five years of funding to continue development of the IPUMS-Time Use tool
Located in Research / Selected Research
Sayer, Pepin research challenges single-mother time poverty
Demography article reports finding that married mothers did more housework and slept less than never-married and divorced mothers, counter to expectations of the time poverty thesis
Located in Research / Selected Research
Texas team re-calculates maternal mortality rate
MacDorman findings from 2016 addressed, somewhat
Located in News
Family Structure and Educational Progress: A Macro-Level Gendered Perspective Across Low- and Lower-Middle Income Countries
Laurie DeRose, Research Assistant Professor, Maryland Population Research Center
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Article ReferenceTeen Mothers’ Family Support and Adult Identity in the Emerging Adulthood: Implications for Socioeconomic Attainment Later in Life
We examined the prospective role of parental support and adult identity profiles in the transition to adulthood on teen mothers’ socioeconomic outcomes in adulthood. Analyses were based on the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, a nationally representative sample of youth followed over a decade. We used data from Waves 1, 3, and 4 (mean age = 28.6, Wave 4). Analytical sample consisted of 981 females who gave birth before age 20. Analysis included design-based regression models. Findings from adjusted regression models showed no statistically significant associations between teen mothers’ parental support and socioeconomic outcomes. While teen mothers have already achieved an important marker of adulthood, variability in adult identity profiles was observed. Teen mothers with older subjective age, regardless of their levels of psychosocial maturation, had higher socioeconomic attainment on some indicators. Findings suggest that teen mothers’ adult identity profiles differentiate their socioeconomic trajectories later in life.
Located in MPRC People / Kerry Green, Ph.D. / Kerry Green Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Who Experiences Leisure Deficits? Mothers' Marital Status and Leisure Time
The authors used the 2003 to 2012 American Time Use Survey to examine marital status variation in mothers' leisure time. They found that never‐married mothers have more total leisure but less high‐quality leisure when compared with married mothers. Never‐married mothers' leisure is concentrated in passive and socially isolated activities that offer fewer social and health benefits. Black single mothers have the highest amount of socially isolated leisure, particularly watching television alone. Results suggest that differences in the context and type of leisure are salient dimensions of the divergent and stratified life conditions of married, divorced, and single mothers.
Located in MPRC People / Liana C. Sayer, Ph.D. / Liana Sayer Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Marital Status and Mothers’ Time Use: Childcare, Housework, Leisure, and Sleep
Assumptions that single mothers are “time poor” compared with married mothers are ubiquitous. We tested theorized associations derived from the time poverty thesis and the gender perspective using the 2003–2012 American Time Use Surveys (ATUS). We found marital status differentiated housework, leisure, and sleep time, but did not influence the amount of time that mothers provided childcare. Net of the number of employment hours, married mothers did more housework and slept less than never-married and divorced mothers, counter to expectations of the time poverty thesis. Never-married and cohabiting mothers reported more total and more sedentary leisure time than married mothers. We assessed the influence of demographic differences among mothers to account for variation in their time use by marital status. Compositional differences explained more than two-thirds of the variance in sedentary leisure time between married and never-married mothers, but only one-third of the variance between married and cohabiting mothers. The larger unexplained gap in leisure quality between cohabiting and married mothers is consistent with the gender perspective.
Located in MPRC People / Liana C. Sayer, Ph.D. / Liana Sayer Publications