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Barbara Okun, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
How grandparental death and aging affect the fertility of adult children: A demographic analysis
Located in Coming Up
Maria Stanfors, Lund University, Sweden
Two for the price of one? Economic consequences of motherhood in contemporary Sweden.
Located in Coming Up
Pablo Gracia, Trinity College
Children's and Adolescents' Daily Activities in Spain: Do Parental Work Schedules Matter?
Located in Coming Up
Hofferth, Sayer lead Time Use Data for Health and Well Being
R01 provides five years of funding to continue development of the IPUMS-Time Use tool
Located in Research / Selected Research
Sayer, Pepin research challenges single-mother time poverty
Demography article reports finding that married mothers did more housework and slept less than never-married and divorced mothers, counter to expectations of the time poverty thesis
Located in Research / Selected Research
Texas team re-calculates maternal mortality rate
MacDorman findings from 2016 addressed, somewhat
Located in News
Family Structure and Educational Progress: A Macro-Level Gendered Perspective Across Low- and Lower-Middle Income Countries
Laurie DeRose, Research Assistant Professor, Maryland Population Research Center
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Philip Cohen comments on American's new marriage trend in NBC News
Social media adds to the pressure of a perfect marriage
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Challenging Stereotypes: A Counter-Narrative of the Contraceptive Experiences of Low-Income Latinas
Purpose: Reproductive autonomy is associated with educational attainment, advanced employment, and wellbeing. While U.S. Latinas use contraception to control their own childbearing and have reported a desire to do so, they often use it inconsistently and have the lowest rates of contraceptive use of any group. Reasons previously cited for why Latinas do not use contraception compared with non-Latino white women include lack of access, lack of knowledge, language barriers, emphasis on large families, machismo, and religiosity. These reasons are often overly simplistic and can lead to widespread generalizations about Latinas. Methods: Using focus groups and semistructured interviews from November 2014 through June 2015, this study describes the family planning perspectives and experiences of 16 Latinas living in Baltimore and recruited from two federally qualified health centers. A social determinant of health framework was used to guide identification of important concepts and explain findings. Results: Results demonstrated that respondents reported contraceptive agency and claimed autonomy over their bodies; described a sense of responsibility and often expressed caution about having families too large to care for; expressed educational and career aspirations; and perceived contraception as critical for the postponement of childbearing to achieve their goals. Conclusion: The patient/provider encounter should include communication that recognizes all patient preferences and lived experiences to support vulnerable and/or marginalized Latinas in their desires to control their own childbearing and life choices.
Located in MPRC People / Ruth Zambrana, Ph.D. / Ruth Zambrana Publications
Liana Sayer featured in WFMJ News on Parenting under Coronavirus Impact
The closings and quarantines prompted by the coronavirus outbreak have given some families more time together.
Located in News