Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

You are here: Home

Search results

344 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type









































New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Atheendar S. Venkataramani, University of Pennsylvania
Maternal Mortality and Women's Political Power
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Availability of Services Related to Achieving Pregnancy in U.S. Publicly Funded Family Planning Clinics
Background Recognizing that quality family planning services should include services to help clients who want to become pregnant, the objective of our analysis was to examine the distribution of services related to achieving pregnancy at publicly funded family planning clinics in the United States. Methods A nationally representative sample of publicly funded clinics was surveyed in 2013–2014 (n = 1615). Clinic administrators were asked about several clinical services and screenings related to achieving pregnancy: basic infertility services, reproductive life plan assessment, screening for body mass index, screening for sexually transmitted diseases, provision of natural family planning services, infertility treatment, and primary care services. The percentage of clinics offering each of these services was compared by Title X funding status; prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated after adjusting for clinic characteristics. Results Compared to non-Title X clinics, Title X clinics were more likely to offer reproductive life plan assessment (adjusted PR [aPR], 1.62; 95% CI, 1.42–1.84), body mass index screening for men (aPR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01–1.21), screening for sexually transmitted diseases (aPRs ranged from 1.21 to 1.37), and preconception health care for men (aPR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01–1.20). Title X clinics were less likely to offer infertility treatment (aPR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.40–0.74) and primary care services (aPR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.68–0.80) and were just as likely to offer basic infertility services, preconception health care services for women, natural family planning, and body mass index screening in women. Conclusions The availability of selected services related to achieving pregnancy differed by Title X status. A follow-up assessment after publication of national family planning recommendations is underway.
Located in MPRC People / Marie Thoma, Ph.D. / Marie Thoma Publications
Avi Ebenstein, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Elderly Coresidence and Son Preference: Can Pension Reforms Solve the ‘Missing Women’ Problem?
Located in Coming Up
Barbara Okun, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
How grandparental death and aging affect the fertility of adult children: A demographic analysis
Located in Coming Up
Beyond the (family) binary: Family environment heterogeneity among transgender adults
Dr. Jessica N. Fish and colleagues examine family response and outcomes for transgender individuals
Located in Research / Selected Research
Cabrera joins the National Research Center on Hispanic Children and Families
New research hub aims to improve policies and programs that serve Hispanic children and families
Located in Research / Selected Research
Cabrera on Mothers’ and Fathers’ Playfulness
Playfulness is associated with children's emotion regulation and vocabulary skills
Located in Research / Selected Research
Can COVID-19 change the work culture at home?
Survey identifies shifts in domestic labor for men and women
Located in News
CANCELED: Connie Gager, Montclair State University
Union Dissolution or Conflict?: The Interactive Effect of Parental Marital Status and Conflict on Adult Children’s Relationship Conflict
Located in Coming Up
CANCELLED: Cynthia Feliciano, Washington University in St. Louis
Contextual Inequalities and Socioeconomic Outcomes among Adult Children of U.S. Immigrants
Located in Coming Up