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Katharine Abraham featured in The New York Times on Coronavirus Depression
The U.S. government is trying to build, at great speed, a three-legged stool to prevent long-lasting economic depression from the Coronavirus outbreak
Located in News
Katharine Abraham featured in The New York Times on Unemployment due to COVID-19 Outbreak
Economists expect as many as a record 20 million job losses and an unemployment rate of around 15% in the April job report
Located in News
Katharine Abraham featured in Bloomberg on Job Saving after the COVID-19 Hit
States' short-time compensation, or shared-work programs, are effective in helping retain trained staff members during COVID-19 outbreak
Located in News
Melissa Kearney's research illuminates COVID recovery potential
We must deliberately spend and invest in ways that will strengthen our capitalist economy and expand economic security, she writes
Located in News
John Haltiwanger featured in Barron's on New Economic Indicators during COVID-19 Pandemic
Two new indicators designed to gauge economic activity on a real-time basis show that the U.S. has already experienced an economic crisis sharper than the 2008 recession and continues to deteriorate.
Located in News
Techreport Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Most Self-Employed Workers Are Independent Contractors
Located in MPRC People / Katharine Abraham, Ph.D. / Katharine Abraham Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Race-Ethnicity, Class, and Unemployment Dynamics: Do Macroeconomic Shifts Alter Existing Disadvantages?
Research indicates that individuals of different races, ethnic backgrounds, and class origins differ in their unemployment rates. We know less, however, about whether these differences result from the differing groups’ unequal hazards of entering or exiting unemployment and even less about how economic fluctuations moderate the ethnoracial and class-origin gaps in the long-term risks of transitioning into and out of unemployment. Using Rounds 1–17 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and event history models, we show that non-Hispanic blacks become more similar to non-Hispanic whites in their paces of entering unemployment as their local unemployment rate rises, perhaps because jobs largely closed to the former are eliminated in a greater proportion during recessions. Nonetheless, blacks’ relatively slow pace of transitioning from unemployment to having a job decelerates further with economic downturns. By contrast, Hispanics’ paces of entering and exiting unemployment relative to non-Hispanic whites hardly change with local unemployment rates, despite unemployed Hispanics’ slower rate of transitioning to having a job. With respect to class origin, we find that the advantages in both unemployment entry and recovery of young men with relatively educated parents diminish with economic deterioration. Based on these results, we suggest that facing economic pressure, employers’ preference for workers of a higher class origin is more malleable than their preference for whites over blacks, making unemployed blacks especially disadvantaged in uncertain economic times. DOI :  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rssm.2019.100422
Located in MPRC People / Wei-hsin Yu, Ph.D. / Wei-hsin Yu Publications
Melissa Kearney Comments on the Decline in Male Workers on NPR
There’s much less demand for the labor of less-educated men despite the job boon after the Great Recession
Located in News