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Article ReferenceTime-use Profiles, Chronic Role Overload, and Women’s Body Weight Trajectories from Middle to Later Life in the Philippines
Although chronic life strain is often found to be associated with adverse health outcomes, empirical research is lacking on the health implications of persistent role overload that many women around the world are subject to, the so-called double burden of work and family responsibilities. Using data from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey (1994-2012), we examined the linkage between time-use profiles and body mass index (BMI) trajectories for Filipino women over an 18-year span. Out of the four classes of women with differential levels of a combination of work and family duties, the group with the heaviest double burden has the highest average BMI. In addition, those who have remained in this class for three or more waves of data not only have higher BMI on average but also have experienced the steepest rate of increase in BMI upon transition from midlife to old age.
Located in Retired Persons / Feinian Chen, Ph.D. / Feinian Chen Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Better a Friend Nearby Than a Brother Far Away? The Health Implications of Foreign Domestic Workers’ Family and Friendship Networks
Migrant domestic workers provide essential services to the families they live with, but they are not considered a part of the family. As a group, they are not well-integrated into the society and often suffer from social isolation. In this article, we explore the potential health buffering effects of their personal network, in terms of family and friendship ties in both the local community and their home country. Existing literature provides inconsistent evidence on who and what matters more, with regard to the nature, strength, and geographic locations of individual personal networks. Using data from the Survey of Migrant domestic Workers in Hong Kong (2017), we find that family ties are extremely important. The presence of family members in Hong Kong as well as daily contact with family, regardless of location, are associated with better self-reported health. Only daily contact with friends in Hong Kong, not with friends in other countries, promotes better health. We also find evidence that the protective effects of family and friends networks depend on each other. Those foreign domestic workers with families in Hong Kong but also maintain daily contact with friends have the best self-reported health among all.
Located in Retired Persons / Feinian Chen, Ph.D. / Feinian Chen Publications
MPRC Affiliate Judith Shinogle
Dr. Shinogle was killed in an automobile accident on 20 May
Located in News
Recession brought downward trend in doctor visits
Mortensen study examines recession effects on health delivery
Located in News
Who are the happiest Americans ?
Faculty Associate John Robinson tracks trends from 1965 to 2010
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Rashawn Ray profiled by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
A member of RWJF Scholars in Health Research program
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Hofferth decries politicization of health care in Baltimore Sun Op-Ed
Calls statements by Eric Cantor and others a "red herring" to avoid uncomfortable policy questions
Located in News
Why Women Live Longer
Faculty Associate Philip Cohen points to male smoking habits as an important factor in understanding the relative longevity of women
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Jogging While Black
Sociologist Rashawn Ray speaks out about the fears that keep many African Americans from exercising
Located in News
Rada Dagher Corrects Misinformation About Postpartum Depression and Postpartum Psychosis
Better diagnosis and care is needed for new moms
Located in News