Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

You are here: Home

Search results

44 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type









































New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Recession and Divorce in the United States: Economic Conditions and the Odds of Divorce, 2008-2010
Philip N. Cohen, University of Maryland; 2012-008
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Philip Cohen comments on American's new marriage trend in NBC News
Social media adds to the pressure of a perfect marriage
Located in News
Philip Cohen comments on Possible Baby Boom after COVID-19 Quarantine on USA Today
The stay-at-home coronavirus orders are unprecedented in America but the speculation about a possible baby boom afterward has generated heat discussion on social media
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The COVID-19 epidemic in rural U.S. counties
Having first reached epidemic proportions in coastal metropolitan areas, COVID-19 has spread 4 around the country. Reported case rates vary across counties from zero to 125 per thousand 5 population (around a state prison in the rural county of Trousdale, Tennessee). Overall, rural 6 counties are underrepresented relative to their share of the population, but a growing proportion 7 of all daily cases and deaths have been reported in rural counties. This analysis uses daily 8 reports for all counties to present the trends and distribution of COVID-19 cases and deaths in 9 rural counties, from late March to May 16, 2020. I describe the relationship between population 10 density and case rates in rural and non-rural counties. Then I focus on noteworthy outbreaks 11 linked to prisons, meat and poultry plants, and nursing homes, many of which are linked to 12 high concentrations of Hispanic, American Indian, and Black populations. The growing 13 epidemic in rural counties is apparently driven by outbreaks concentrated in these institutional 14 settings, which are conducive to transmission. The impact of the epidemic in rural areas may 15 be heightened due to their weaker health infrastructure and more vulnerable populations, 16 especially due to age, socioeconomic status, and health conditions. As a result, the epidemic 17 may contribute to the ongoing decline of health, economic, and social conditions in rural areas.
Located in MPRC People / Philip Cohen, Ph.D. / Philip Cohen Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The Coming Divorce Decline
This article analyzes U.S. divorce trends over the past decade and considers their implications for future divorce rates. Modeling women’s odds of divorce from 2008 to 2017 using marital events data from the American Community Survey, I find falling divorce rates with or without adjustment for demographic covariates. Age-specific divorce rates show that the trend is driven by younger women, which is consistent with longer term trends showing uniquely high divorce rates among people born in the Baby Boom period. Finally, I analyze the characteristics of newly married women and estimate the trend in their likelihood of divorcing based on the divorce models. The results show falling divorce risks for more recent marriages. The accumulated evidence thus points toward continued decline in divorce rates. The United States is progressing toward a system in which marriage is rarer and more stable than it was in the past.
Located in MPRC People / Philip Cohen, Ph.D. / Philip Cohen Publications
Article ReferenceThe rising marriage mortality gap among Whites
Although the decline in marriage has been cited as a possible contributor to the “despair” afflicting marginalized White communities, these studies have not directly considered mortality by marital status. This paper uses complete death certificate data from the Mortality Multiple Cause Files with American Community Survey data to examine age-specific mortality rates for married and non-married people from 2007 to 2017. The overall rise in White mortality is limited almost exclusively to those who are not married, for men and women. By comparison, mortality for Blacks and Hispanics has fallen or remained flat regardless of marital status (except for young, single Hispanic men). Analysis by education level shows death rates have risen most for Whites with the lowest education, but have also increased for those with high school or some college. Because mortality has risen faster for unmarried Whites at all but the lowest education levels, there has been an increase in the marriage mortality ratio. Mortality differentials are an increasingly important component of the social hierarchy associated with marital status.
Located in MPRC People / Philip Cohen, Ph.D. / Philip Cohen Publications
Philip Cohen comments on Americans' dropping divorce rate on NPR
Divorce has become more acceptable, less stigmatized, but also less common
Located in News
Families and Inequality
Faculty Associate Philip Cohen brings sociology research to the public eye by tackling thorny issues about race, gender, family, and inequality in an online public forum.
Located in Research / Selected Research
Parental Age and Children's Disability in the United States
Philip Cohen and Gneisha Dinwiddie investigate the effects of parents' age on the health of their babies
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Philip Cohen featured in The Hill on Domestic Violence During COVID-19 Quarantine
Police departments across the country are reporting a spike in domestic violence cases as stay-at-home orders put victims and their abusers in constant proximity.
Located in News