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Article ReferenceInsurance coverage and health care utilization among Asian youth before and after the Affordable Care Act
Objective: We examined changes in insurance coverage and health care utilization associated with the Affordable Care Act (ACA) among subgroups of Asian youth relative to non-Latino white youth. Methods: Data were from the 2010-2017 American Community Survey and National Health Interview Survey. Difference-in-difference models were used to examine changes in insurance coverage and health care utilization associated with the ACA among subgroups of Asian youth relative to white youth and subgroups of Asian youth in households below 200% of the federal poverty level (FPL) relative to comparable white youth. Results: Since the implementation of the ACA, insurance coverage increased among all Asian subgroups and white youth. The magnitude of the increase in insurance coverage was larger among Asian subgroups than white youth. More pronounced increases were found among almost all Asian subgroups in households below 200% FPL. Changes in health care utilization were limited and varied by subgroup. Increases in well-child visits were observed only among Chinese and “other” Asian youth. Conclusions: Insurance coverage increased among Asian youth after the implementation of the ACA. Improvements in health care utilization were limited and differed by subgroups. Programs to improve health care utilization should be tailored to Asian youth according to subgroup.
Located in MPRC People / Jie Chen, Ph.D. / Jie Chen Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Evidence of the Linkage Between Hospital-based Care Coordination Strategies and Hospital Overall (Star) Ratings
BACKGROUND:In the new era of value-based payment models and pay for performance, hospitals are in search of the silver bullet strategy or bundle of strategies capable of improving their performance on quality measures. OBJECTIVES:To determine whether there is an association between adoption of hospital-based care coordination strategies and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services overall hospital quality (star) ratings and readmission rates. RESEARCH DESIGN:We used survey data from the American Hospital Association (AHA) and categorized respondents by the number of care coordination strategies that they reported having widely implemented. We used multiple logistic regression models to examine the association between the number of strategies and hospital overall rating performance and disease-specific 30-day excess readmission ratios, while controlling for hospital and county characteristics and state-fixed effects. SUBJECTS:A total of 710 general acute care noncritical access hospitals that received star ratings and responded to the 2015 AHA Care Systems and Payment Survey. MEASURES:Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services overall hospital ratings, 30-day excess readmission ratios. RESULTS:As compared with hospitals with 0-2 strategies, hospitals with 3 to 4 strategies (P=0.007), 5-7 strategies (P=0.002), or 8-12 strategies (P=0.002) had approximately 2.5× the odds of receiving a top rating (4 or 5 stars). Care coordination strategies were positively associated with lower 30-day readmission ratios for patients with chronic medical conditions, but not for surgical patients. Medication reconciliation, visit summaries, outreach after discharge, discharge care plans, and disease management programs were each individually associated with top ratings. CONCLUSIONS:Care coordination strategies are associated with high overall hospital ratings.
Located in MPRC People / Jie Chen, Ph.D. / Jie Chen Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Accountable Care Organizations and Preventable Hospitalizations Among Patients With Depression
Introduction Accountable care organizations have been successful in improving quality of care, but little is known about who is benefiting from accountable care organizations and through what mechanism. This study examined variation of potentially preventable hospitalizations for chronic conditions with coexisting depression in adults by hospital accountable care organization affiliation and care coordination strategies by race/ethnicity. Methods Data  files of 11 states from 2015 State Inpatient Databases were used to identify potentially preventable hospitalizations for chronic conditions with coexisting depression by race/ethnicity; the 2015 American Hospital Association's Annual Survey was used to identify hospital accountable care organization affiliation; and American Hospital Association's Survey of Care Systems and Payment (collected from January to August 2016) was used to identify hospital Accountable care organizations affiliation and hospital-based care coordination strategies, such as telephonic outreach, and chronic care management. In 2019, multiple logistic regressions was used to test the probability of potentially preventable hospitalization by accountable care organization affiliation and race/ethnicity. The test was repeated on a subsample analysis of accountable care organization–affiliated hospitals by care coordination strategy. Results Preventable hospitalizations were significantly lower among accountable care organization–affiliated hospitals than accountable care organization–unaffiliated hospitals. Lower preventable hospitalization rates were observed among white, African American, Native American, and Hispanic patients. Effective care coordination strategies varied by patients’ race. Results also showed variation of the adoption of specific care coordination strategies among accountable care organization–affiliated hospitals. Analysis further indicated effective care coordination strategies varied by patients’ race. Conclusions Accountable care organizations and specifically designed care coordination strategies can potentially improve preventable hospitalization rates and racial disparities among patients with depression. Findings support the integration of mental and physical health services and provide insights for Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services risk adjustment efforts across race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status.
Located in MPRC People / Jie Chen, Ph.D. / Jie Chen Publications
Desai, Chen research on Fathers' migration in Demographic Research
Examines nutritional impact of father outmigration
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Utilization of essential preventive health services among Asians after the implementation of the preventive services provisions of the Affordable Care Act
Utilization of cost-effective essential preventive health services increased after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) provision that non-grandfathered private insurers provide cost-effective preventive services without cost sharing in 2010. Little is known, however, whether this change is also observed among Asians in the US. We examined patterns of preventive services utilization among Asian subgroups relative to non-Latino whites (whites) after the implementation of the ACA’s preventive services provisions. Using 2013–2016 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data, we examined utilization trends in preventive services among Asian Indians, Chinese, Filipinos, and other Asians relative to whites. We also ran logistic regression models to estimate the likelihood of having received each of the seven essential preventive services (routine checkups, flu vaccinations, cholesterol screenings, blood pressure checkups, Papanicolaou “pap” tests, mammograms, and colorectal cancer screenings). Compared to whites, Asians had higher rates of utilization of routine checkups, cholesterol screenings, and flu vaccinations, but they had lower utilization rates of blood pressure checkups, pap tests, and mammograms. The patterns of preventive services utilization differed across the Asian subgroups. All Asian subgroups, except for Filipinos, were less likely to have pap tests or mammograms than whites. Moreover, we observed a decreasing trend in having pap tests, mammograms, or colorectal cancer screenings among all Asian subgroups between 2013 and 2016. Our findings suggest that there are low cancer screening rates across Asian subgroups. This indicates the need for programs tailored to specific Asian subgroups to improve cancer screening.
Located in MPRC People / Jie Chen, Ph.D. / Jie Chen Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Changes in sleep duration associated with retirement transitions: The role of naps
This study examined the changes in sleep duration (total sleep time, night‐time sleep and daytime naps) after retirement transitions in China using a panel dataset of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study in 2011, 2013 and 2015 with a total of 48,458 respondents. Linear regression analysis with generalized estimating equations was employed to examine the changes in sleep duration after transitions between different types of employment status. After controlling for the confounders, the results showed that the retired population and the population working in agricultural sectors slept 8.02 ( p  < .01) and 5.19 ( p  < .01) minutes longer than the population working in non‐agricultural sectors, respectively. Employment transition also had significant effects on sleep duration. Transition from non‐agricultural sectors to retirement increased total sleep time by 13.58 ( p  < .01) minutes and also raised the probability of daytime naps by 18% (OR = 1.18,  p  < .01). Transition from agricultural employment to retirement did not significantly affect the total sleep time, but significantly increased the probability of daytime naps (OR = 1.12,  p  = .02). Reentering the non‐agricultural sectors for the retirees did not significantly affect night‐time sleep, but decreased the probability of daytime naps (OR = 0.73,  p  < .01) and daytime nap duration (by 5.26 min,  p  = .01). In conclusion, people in China increased their sleep duration after transitions to retirement, but the magnitudes were much smaller than those in Western countries. Differences may be attributed to an abundant amount of Chinese people working in agricultural sectors, the high volume of retired people reentering the work force and the large proportion of people in China that had daytime naps at baseline.
Located in MPRC People / Jie Chen, Ph.D. / Jie Chen Publications
Lin interviewed for story on Indian marriage market
Marriage choices depend on factors other than education
Located in News