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Melissa Kearney's research illuminates COVID recovery potential
We must deliberately spend and invest in ways that will strengthen our capitalist economy and expand economic security, she writes
Located in News
MPRC Associates lead COVID-19 pilot study
University of Maryland Seed Grant funds research into COVID-19 social impacts
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Coverage Error in Data Collection Combining Mobile Surveys With Passive Measurement Using Apps: Data From a German National Survey
Researchers are combining self-reports from mobile surveys with passive data collection using sensors and apps on smartphones increasingly more often. While smartphones are commonly used in some groups of individuals, smartphone penetration is significantly lower in other groups. In addition, different operating systems (OSs) limit how mobile data can be collected passively. These limitations cause concern about coverage error in studies targeting the general population. Based on data from the Panel Study Labour Market and Social Security (PASS), an annual probability-based mixed-mode survey on the labor market and poverty in Germany, we find that smartphone ownership and ownership of smartphones with specific OSs are correlated with a number of sociodemographic and substantive variables.
Located in MPRC People / Frauke Kreuter, Ph.D. / Frauke Kreuter Publications
Sacoby Wilson featured in Gizmodo on Health Equity amid the COVID-19 Outbreak
Health experts had suspected the coronavirus pandemic would kill more people in areas where there’s higher air pollution. Now, they have preliminary data to back it up.
Located in News
Sacoby Wilson comments on Social Factors of COVID-19 Pandemic Impacts on Prince Georgian's Health on Capital Gazette
In Maryland and across the nation, black people are becoming ill and dying at disproportionate rates because of the coronavirus pandemic.
Located in News
John Haltiwanger featured in Barron's on New Economic Indicators during COVID-19 Pandemic
Two new indicators designed to gauge economic activity on a real-time basis show that the U.S. has already experienced an economic crisis sharper than the 2008 recession and continues to deteriorate.
Located in News
MPRC presentations at Virtual PAA Annual Meeting
The PAA Annual Meeting has gone virtual
Located in News
Article ReferenceGender inequalities and household fuel choice in India
The use of solid cooking fuels—wood, straw, crop residue, and cow-dung cakes—is associated with higher levels of environmental pollution and health burden. However, even in an era when incomes have grown and poverty has declined, the proportion of Indian households using clean cooking fuels such as kerosene or Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) has increased only slightly. Even among the wealthiest quintile, only about 40 percent of the households rely solely on clean fuel. Since the chores of cooking and collection of fuel remain primarily the domain of women, we argue that intra-household gender inequalities play an important role in shaping the household decision to invest in clean fuel. Analyses using data from the India Human Development Survey (IHDS), a panel survey of over 41,000 households conducted in two waves in 2004-05 and 2011–12, respectively, show that women's access to salaried work and control over household expenditure decisions is associated with the use of clean fuel.
Located in MPRC People / Sonalde Desai, Ph.D. / Sonalde Desai Publications
Article ReferenceWage Inequality in Latin America: Learning from Matched Employer-Employee Data
Inequality in Latin America fell substantially in the early 2000s. In this paper, we take advantage of administrative matched employee-employed data in Brazil, Chile and Ecuador to examine whether these inequality trends held in the formal sector, as well. We document a significant decrease in the log variance of earnings in Brazil and Ecuador in the early 2000s, whereas inequality in Chile between 2008 and 2015 remained largely flat. In this context, we find that inequality among salaried workers is largely a between-firm phenomenon across these three countries. We expand on our descriptive analysis and estimate an additive worker and firm fixed effects model to understand the driving factors behind inequality in the region. We find a significant decline in between-firm inequality in Brazil and a modest one in Chile. We last focus our attention on the commodities and manufacturing sectors, which were directly exposed to two large external shocks, the commodity-boom and the ''China Shock". We find an increase in inequality in the former sector accompanied by an reduction in inequality in the latter across the region.
Located in MPRC People / Sergio Urzua, Ph.D. / Sergio Urzua Publications
Rashawn Ray featured in CBS Baltimore on Communities of Color disproportionally hit by COVID-19
Statistics show African Americans are disproportionately impacted by the coronavirus, and new research found certain pre-existing conditions may put them at higher risk.
Located in News