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Department of Economics Seminar: Labor/Public Finance/Development
Speaker: Benjamin Marx, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Located in Coming Up
Department of Economics Seminar: Diane Alexander, Princeton University
Labor / Public Finance / Development
Located in Coming Up
Department of Economics Seminar: Ester Duflo, MIT
Labor / Public Finance / Development
Located in Coming Up
Department of Economics Seminar: Amir Jina, University of Chicago
Labor/Public Finance/Development
Located in Coming Up
Department of Economics Seminar: Labor/Public Finance/Development
Speaker: Quy-Toan Do, World Bank
Located in Coming Up
Department of Economics Seminar: Labor/Public Finance/Development
Speaker: Joshua Gottlieb, University of British Columbia
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The Economic Gap Among Women in Time Spent on Housework in Former West Germany and Sweden
The quantitative scholarship on domestic labor has documented the existence of a gender gap in its performance in all countries for which data are available. Only recently have researchers begun to analyze economic disparities  among  women in their time spent doing housework, and their studies have been largely limited to the U.S. We extend this line of inquiry using data from two European countries, the former West Germany and Sweden. We estimate the “economic gap” in women’s housework time, which we define as the difference between the time spent by women at the lowest and highest deciles of their own earnings. We expect this gap to be smaller in Sweden given its celebrated success at reducing both gender and income inequality. Though Swedish women do spend less time on domestic labor, however, and though there is indeed less earnings inequality among them, the economic gap in their housework is only a little smaller than among women in the former West Germany. In both places, a significant negative association between women’s individual earnings and their housework time translates into economic gaps of more than 2.5 hours per week. Moreover, in both countries, women at the highest earnings decile experience a gender gap in housework that is smaller by about 4 hours per week compared to their counterparts at the lowest decile.
Located in MPRC People / Liana C. Sayer, Ph.D. / Liana Sayer Publications
The Impact of Family Income in the First Year of Life on Child and Maternal Health: Evidence from the Earned Income Tax Credit
Michel Boudreaux, Health Policy and Management, and Anuj Gangopadhyaya, Urban Institute
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Stephane Helleringer, Johns Hopkins
The potential of computer vision tools for improving demographic measurement in low-income countries
Located in Coming Up
Econ SEMINAR: LABOR/PUBLIC FINANCE/DEVELOPMENT; Rebecca Diamond, Stanford Graduate School of Business
The Gender Earnings Gap in the Gig Economy: Evidence from over a Million Rideshare Drivers
Located in Coming Up