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Haltiwanger paper contributes to job creation debate
Lack of new startups hurts job growth and competition
Located in News
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Heterogenous Economic Returns to Postsecondary Degrees: Evidence from Chile
Sergio Urzua, University of Maryland; Loreto Reyes, Ministry of Finance, Chile; Jorge Rodriguez, University of Chicago; 2013-018
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
How Ending a Conditional Cash Transfer Program Impacts Children’s School Enrollment: Evidence from Mexico
Susan W. Parker, Public Policy
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
FileHow Firms Respond to Business Cycles: The Role of Firm Age and Firm Size
John Haltiwanger, University of Maryland, et al.; 2013-020
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Improving Health Outcomes by Choosing Better Doctors: Evidence of Social Learning from Rural Tanzania
Kenneth L. Leonard, Associate Professor, Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics, University of Maryland
Located in Coming Up
Inaugural Schelling Lecture
Glenn C. Loury, Merton P. Stoltz Professor of the Social Sciences and Professor of Economics at Brown University
Located in Coming Up
Inequality and Teenage "Drop Out" Behaviors
Melissa Kearney and colleagues examine a hypothetical "desperation" effect on economically disadvantaged students through a grant funded by the Smith Richardson Foundation
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article ReferenceInternational organizations and the political economy of reforms
We develop a simple dynamic model of policy reform that captures some of the determinants that underlie the differences between the reform paths taken by a number of countries since the early 1990s. The model focuses on the interaction between domestic institutions and international organizations that promote reform, on the one hand, and the political incentives for reversing reforms, on the other. At equilibrium, there are three types of reform paths. A country can undergo a full-scale, lasting reform, can carry out a partial but lasting reform, or can go through cycles of reforms and costly counter-reforms. Domestic institutions, along with the incentives provided by international organizations, determine the equilibrium path. A politically myopic international organization may induce cycles of reforms and costly counter-reforms, thereby reducing the country's well-being. An international organization that only provides funds to promote reforms may have a less beneficial effect than one that assists the country with fresh funds to defend reforms when there is a risk of reversal. International funds that promote reforms can also influence domestic institutions. For example, due to the intervention of an international organization, countries could have incentives to dismantle institutions that build up reversal cost and/or do not fully build their fiscal capacity.
Located in MPRC People / Sebastian Galiani, Ph.D. / Sebastian Galiani Publications
Job creation linked to company age, not size
Faculty Associate John Haltiwanger's paper with two Census Bureau economists challenges conventional wisdom
Located in Research / Selected Research
John Haltiwanger cited on NPR's Morning Edition
Job creation happens more often in young businesses, not small businesses
Located in News