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Katharine Abraham comments on Misleading Economic Data during COVID-19 on The New York Times
The tools we have to understand what is happening to the economy are becoming distorted or harder to interpret.
Located in News
John Haltiwanger featured in Barron's on New Economic Indicators during COVID-19 Pandemic
Two new indicators designed to gauge economic activity on a real-time basis show that the U.S. has already experienced an economic crisis sharper than the 2008 recession and continues to deteriorate.
Located in News
Melissa Kearney's research illuminates COVID recovery potential
We must deliberately spend and invest in ways that will strengthen our capitalist economy and expand economic security, she writes
Located in News
Katharine Abraham featured in Bloomberg on Job Saving after the COVID-19 Hit
States' short-time compensation, or shared-work programs, are effective in helping retain trained staff members during COVID-19 outbreak
Located in News
Katharine Abraham featured in The New York Times on Unemployment due to COVID-19 Outbreak
Economists expect as many as a record 20 million job losses and an unemployment rate of around 15% in the April job report
Located in News
How Ending a Conditional Cash Transfer Program Impacts Children’s School Enrollment: Evidence from Mexico
Susan W. Parker, Public Policy
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Melissa Kearney analyzes COVID-19 Social Insurance on EconoFact
Cash payments provide a financial lifeline through this time of income loss. Workers in the hardest-hit industries have low earnings and few savings.
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Voting for Democracy: Chile's Plebiscito and the Electoral Participation of a Generation
This paper assesses if voting for democracy affects long-term electoral participation. We study the effects of participating in Chile's 1988 plebiscite, which determined whether democracy would be reinstated after a 15-year long military dictatorship. Taking advantage of individual-level voting data for upwards of 13 million Chileans, we implement an age-based RD design comparing long run registration and turnout rates across marginally eligible and ineligible individuals. We find that Plebiscite eligibility (participation) significantly increased electoral turnout three decades later, reaching 1.8 (3.3) percentage points in the 2017 Presidential election. These effects are robust to different specifications and distinctive to the 1988 referendum. We discuss potential mechanisms concluding that the scale of initial mobilization explains the estimated effects. We find that plebiscite eligibility induced a sizable share of less educated voters to register to vote compared to eligibles in other upstream elections. Since less educated voters tended to support Chile's governing left-wing coalition, we argue that the plebiscite contributed to the emergence of one party rule the twenty years following democratization.
Located in MPRC People / Sergio Urzua, Ph.D. / Sergio Urzua Publications
The Impact of Family Income in the First Year of Life on Child and Maternal Health: Evidence from the Earned Income Tax Credit
Michel Boudreaux, Health Policy and Management, and Anuj Gangopadhyaya, Urban Institute
Located in Resources / / Seed Grant Program / Seed Grants Awarded
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The Importance of Informal Work in Supplementing Household Income
According to a Federal Reserve survey, nearly 30 percent of respondents reported informal work for pay in the prior month, ranging from online work to personal services to selling goods. Informal work plays a particularly important role in the household finances of minorities, the unemployed, and those who report financial hardship. Independent contractors, other self-employed, and those with unpredictable work schedules are especially reliant on informal work to supplement their income, possibly symptomatic of inadequate or unstable earnings associated with these types of work.
Located in MPRC People / Katharine Abraham, Ph.D. / Katharine Abraham Publications